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Mr. Blue
04-02-2007, 03:45 PM
This thread (http://www.dcjunkies.com/showthread.php?t=822) got me thinking about my own education and a decision that I made when I was in high school that really gave me a solid foundation. When I was going to school language was mandatory, so I was taking French (yeah I know), and took 3 years of it.

When I got to high school I could have continued on with a second language for another 3 years or I could take business classes instead. Well, I sat myself down and thought, "When am I ever going to use French again?"...the answer was never.

So I opted to take business classes...out of a student body of 3000 students, the class consisted of only 15 pupils. I'm not sure why this wasn't a popular choice, perhaps it was because the class was taught by a Korean War Vet that had this really bad facial tick or the fact that business just seemed like a lame class to take.

Three years of lessons and I learned everything from basic accounting to business law. Those 3 years of business classes helped me more to survive in life than any other class that I took.

A friend was babbling about Robert Kiyoski recently (Rich Father Poor Father guy) and one thing he stressed is how school doesn't teach you about money. Well hell, I learned that lesson on my own but he's dead right.

Why is it that business classes aren't mandatory? Knowing how to handle money is way more important than learning a second language.

kres24GT
04-02-2007, 03:51 PM
This thread (http://www.dcjunkies.com/showthread.php?t=822) got me thinking about my own education and a decision that I made when I was in high school that really gave me a solid foundation. When I was going to school language was mandatory, so I was taking French (yeah I know), and took 3 years of it.

When I got to high school I could have continued on with a second language for another 3 years or I could take business classes instead. Well, I sat myself down and thought, "When am I ever going to use French again?"...the answer was never.

So I opted to take business classes...out of a student body of 3000 students, the class consisted of only 15 pupils. I'm not sure why this wasn't a popular choice, perhaps it was because the class was taught by a Korean War Vet that had this really bad facial tick or the fact that business just seemed like a lame class to take.

Three years of lessons and I learned everything from basic accounting to business law. Those 3 years of business classes helped me more to survive in life than any other class that I took.

A friend was babbling about Robert Kiyoski recently (Rich Father Poor Father guy) and one thing he stressed is how school doesn't teach you about money. Well hell, I learned that lesson on my own but he's dead right.

Why is it that business classes aren't mandatory? Knowing how to handle money is way more important than learning a second language.


You never hear anyone talk about this, and I couldn't agree with you more. It's absolutely astounding that we graduate people from high school with some much "useless" knowledge, but little to no understanding of money or economics.

The simple answer is that this is the way the politicians want it. They need to keep the people ignorant, especially in matters of money. Otherwise they can't stay in power. The idea if a public education has always been to create government dependence and loyalty.

The government needs a few bread winners obviously to keep the economy up, but they want to keep as many people as possible ignorant and dependent on them.

Caskey_91
04-07-2007, 06:39 PM
This thread (http://www.dcjunkies.com/showthread.php?t=822) got me thinking about my own education and a decision that I made when I was in high school that really gave me a solid foundation. When I was going to school language was mandatory, so I was taking French (yeah I know), and took 3 years of it.

When I got to high school I could have continued on with a second language for another 3 years or I could take business classes instead. Well, I sat myself down and thought, "When am I ever going to use French again?"...the answer was never.

So I opted to take business classes...out of a student body of 3000 students, the class consisted of only 15 pupils. I'm not sure why this wasn't a popular choice, perhaps it was because the class was taught by a Korean War Vet that had this really bad facial tick or the fact that business just seemed like a lame class to take.

Three years of lessons and I learned everything from basic accounting to business law. Those 3 years of business classes helped me more to survive in life than any other class that I took.

A friend was babbling about Robert Kiyoski recently (Rich Father Poor Father guy) and one thing he stressed is how school doesn't teach you about money. Well hell, I learned that lesson on my own but he's dead right.

Why is it that business classes aren't mandatory? Knowing how to handle money is way more important than learning a second language.


I see the point that you are making I have taken both a Spanish course and a business course so far in my High School years. I don't think I will be taking either course topics at all even though my computer apps teacher is trying to get me to take his accounting course which I had is really tough.

But thing is unlike most kids I know my parents have instilled in me the value of a dollar (even though most of the time it just burns a hole through my pocket :)). So I really don't have as much need to take a course along those lines even though where required to take a consumer or resource management class which both pretty much teach the same idea.

But also in this growing world of outsourcing and all it is more than likely to learn a second language so you can get a job so you can get the money that you need to learn how to manage.

But in a reality

Money managment and buisness is a more important topic right now.

Scouty
04-07-2007, 06:49 PM
I had some intro to business in my highschool coursework way back when. (20 yers ago). What I found was that I had to learn some things the 'hard' way in spite of what I had learned. My family even 'showed' me, by their actions, what being fiscally responsible was, but myself and many friends once aagin had to make some of our own mistakes.

I think the concept is great, of teaching more money in eduication, but there is still that element in a lot of youths that 'for them it will be different'. The most valuable education I had to get about money was getting into some jackpots, and then by getting back out by myself. It was scarey. But a lot of those lessons are burned on my soul now!

I will say that I don't feel credit card companies should be allowed to prey upon young college freshmen the way they do. They should not be allowed to 'promote' credit upon a population that, as you stated, is not well-informed about money matters.