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nondual
04-17-2011, 07:13 AM
ZeitNews (http://www.zeitnews.org/)

A Technology Team Application

Technology For Building a Better World
_______________________________________


In essence, to me, all of the marvels of science and technology, all of the electronic and mechanical wonders,
are just so many millions of tonnes of junk unless it enhances the lives of men.' -- Jacque Fresco

This website is provided by the Zeitgeist Movement. Therefore, we are able to provide this service to you for free and without annoying advertisements.

ZeitNews.org is a science-oriented website dedicated to technology news. We operate as a branch of the Zeitgeist Movement's Technology Team as an information hub which aims to inform as many people as possible about the current advancements and capabilities of science and technology. Technology is rapidly developing -- faster than many of us realize -- and with this website we aim to provide a clear picture of just how quickly this is happening through daily reporting of developments and breakthroughs around the world.

We hope to actively engage as many people as possible in recognizing that our current technological development is far more advanced than the majority of humans currently realize. By raising awareness of emerging technologies that can free humans from unnecessary work, while practically and efficiently providing for all with minimal, if any, human effort, we hope to build a global understanding of how this technology can improve everyday life for human beings -- making the human species much more likely to achieve its productive and innovative potential.

However, global awareness of technology is only a small part of what the Zeitgeist Movement is working to achieve. To get a better understanding of our efforts please explore the articles, videos, and extensive documentation which we provide for free at www.thezeitgeistmovement.com.

If you understand and agree with our basic principles and support our efforts, we invite and encourage you to contact the Zeitgeist Movement chapter in your area to learn about how you can get involved - a listing of all official chapters can be found at www.thezeitgeistmovement.com.

For optimum viewing of the Zeitnews website, we recommend using Firefox, Opera, Chrome or Safari - these web browsers allow the page layout and features to display fully. Due to some minor limitations with Internet Explorer, the site is not fully compatible with this web browser; Users of IE are advised that although they will still be able to access the site and all of its features, some superficial elements such as layout and presentation may appear distorted or compromised.


- ZeitNews (http://www.zeitnews.org/) Team

OldMercsRule
04-17-2011, 08:24 AM
Here is a fairly neutral site fer science that I look at from time ta time:

http://www.realclearscience.com/

It is related to the RealClear family of sites that are a great way ta quickly read lots of stuff...... :thumbsup:

nondual
04-17-2011, 10:08 AM
Here is a fairly neutral site fer science that I look at from time ta time:

http://www.realclearscience.com/

It is related to the RealClear family of sites that are a great way ta quickly read lots of stuff...... :thumbsup:
RealClear science? What kind of stuff, Creationism? :lmao2:

OldMercsRule
04-17-2011, 10:23 AM
RealClear science? What kind of stuff, Creationism? :lmao2:


Visit it dummy n' see fer yersef... :taunt:

nondual
05-07-2011, 07:13 AM
Screw Oil! (http://zeitnewsblog.blogspot.com/2011/04/screw-oil.html)

Hello, Zeitnews!

As I demonstrated back in January (http://zeitnewsblog.blogspot.com/2011/01/power-is-yours.html), we have no need to use fossil fuels to generate electricity or to propel vehicles -- in fact, we haven't needed fossil fuels for those applications for some time, but oh well, what's done is done and I won't hold a grudge (grrr...). However, I have come across some criticism from individuals claiming that, while we 'might not' need to use fossil fuels for energy -- gotta love that naivete -- we still need them to manufacture certain components for the solar panels, wind turbines, etc., which is true -- or was up until about six months ago.

I'm going to keep this short and sweet; hydrocarbons are necessary -- and will be, at least for as long as I can foresee -- to produce pretty much everything we use today (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petrochemicals) (other links: 1 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methanol), 2 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acetic_acid), 3 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acetic_anhydride), 4 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formaldehyde)), however, we do not need fossil fuels to produce these hydrocarbons. Back in late-November, 2010, a team of chemical engineers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst developed a process of producing the hydrocarbons necessary for the manufacturing of various industrial chemicals using biomass -- dead plants -- allowing humanity to "reduce or eliminate industry’s reliance on fossil fuels to make industrial chemicals." (http://www.umass.edu/newsoffice/newsreleases/articles/116005.php)

I guess this means that we no longer need fossil fuels for energy, electricity, or industry, so what's our excuse now?

- Leo Alexander

OldMercsRule
05-07-2011, 11:26 AM
Screw Oil! (http://zeitnewsblog.blogspot.com/2011/04/screw-oil.html)

Hello, Zeitnews!

As I demonstrated back in January (http://zeitnewsblog.blogspot.com/2011/01/power-is-yours.html), we have no need to use fossil fuels to generate electricity or to propel vehicles -- in fact, we haven't needed fossil fuels for those applications for some time, but oh well, what's done is done and I won't hold a grudge (grrr...). However, I have come across some criticism from individuals claiming that, while we 'might not' need to use fossil fuels for energy -- gotta love that naivete -- we still need them to manufacture certain components for the solar panels, wind turbines, etc., which is true -- or was up until about six months ago.

I'm going to keep this short and sweet; hydrocarbons are necessary -- and will be, at least for as long as I can foresee -- to produce pretty much everything we use today (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petrochemicals) (other links: 1 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methanol), 2 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acetic_acid), 3 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acetic_anhydride), 4 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formaldehyde)), however, we do not need fossil fuels to produce these hydrocarbons. Back in late-November, 2010, a team of chemical engineers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst developed a process of producing the hydrocarbons necessary for the manufacturing of various industrial chemicals using biomass -- dead plants -- allowing humanity to "reduce or eliminate industry’s reliance on fossil fuels to make industrial chemicals." (http://www.umass.edu/newsoffice/newsreleases/articles/116005.php)

I guess this means that we no longer need fossil fuels for energy, electricity, or industry, so what's our excuse now?

- Leo Alexander

Have you beeeeeen drinkin' some of yer own kool aid?


:lmao2: :banana: :happy: :yay:

nondual
05-07-2011, 10:40 PM
Have you beeeeeen drinkin' some of yer own kool aid?
You are not my mommy... you are not my mommy... you are not my mommy...

:crazzy:

nondual
05-08-2011, 06:38 AM
May 06, 2011

'Swiss Cheese' Design Enables Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells With Potential for Higher Efficiencies
(http://www.zeitnews.org/energy-and-fuels-research/swiss-cheese-design-enables-thin-film-silicon-solar-cells-with-potential-for-higher-efficiencies.html)
Energy and Fuels Research

http://images.sciencedaily.com/2011/05/110506165312-large.jpg

A bold new design for thin film solar cells that requires significantly less silicon -- and may boost their efficiency -- is the result of an industry/academia collaboration between Oerlikon Solar in Switzerland and the Institute of Physics' photovoltaic group at the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. One long-term option for low-cost, high-yield industrial production of solar panels from abundant raw materials can be found in amorphous silicon solar cells and microcrystalline silicon tandem cells (a.k.a. Micromorph) -- providing an energy payback within a year. A drawback to these…

OldMercsRule
05-08-2011, 12:44 PM
You are not my mommy... you are not my mommy... you are not my mommy...


Does yer weak brain studder or some such, dummy?


BTW: HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY



:lmao2: :banana: :happy: :yay:

nondual
05-09-2011, 03:39 PM
May 09, 2011

Toward Optical Computing in Handheld Electronics: Graphene Optical Modulators Could Lead to Ultrafast Communications (http://www.zeitnews.org/engineering-and-computer-science-research/toward-optical-computing-in-handheld-electronics-graphene-optical-modulators-could-lead-to-ultrafast-communications.html)

Engineering and Computer Science Research

http://images.sciencedaily.com/2011/05/110508134927-large.jpg

Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have demonstrated a new technology for graphene that could break the current speed limits in digital communications. The team of researchers, led by UC Berkeley engineering professor Xiang Zhang, built a tiny optical device that uses graphene, a one-atom-thick layer of crystallized carbon, to switch light on and off. This switching ability is the fundamental characteristic of a network modulator, which controls the speed at which data packets are transmitted. The faster the data pulses are sent out, the greater the volume of information…

nondual
05-16-2011, 07:04 AM
May 14, 2011

Renewables may supply 80 per cent of our energy by 2050 (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/renewables-may-supply-80-per-cent-of-our-energy-by-2050.html)

Energy

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/renewable-energy-solutions.jpg

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has this week set out a rosy vision of our green future – alongside a bleak warning of an alternative outcome. With the right governmental backing we could get almost 80 per cent of our energy from renewable energy sources by 2050, according to the IPCC'sSpecial Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation. The report comes as governments continue to debate what cuts in greenhouse gas emissions they can promise at resumed climate talks in Durban, South Africa, in November. Youba Sokona, co-chair of the IPCC working group on…

nondual
05-20-2011, 06:41 AM
May 19, 2011

Record Efficiency of 18.7 Percent for Flexible Solar Cells on Plastics in Energy and Fuels Research (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy-and-fuels-research/record-efficiency-of-187-percent-for-flexible-solar-cells-on-plastics.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/110519101355.jpg

Scientists at Empa, the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, have further boosted the energy conversion efficiency of flexible solar cells made of copper indium gallium (di)selenide (also known as CIGS) to a new world record of 18.7 percent -- a significant improvement over the previous record of 17.6 percent achieved by the same team in June 2010. The measurements have been independently certified by the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems in Freiburg, Germany. It's all about money. To make solar electricity affordable on a large scale, scientists and…

nondual
05-21-2011, 11:13 AM
New solar product captures up to 95 percent of light energy (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/new-solar-product-captures-up-to-95-percent-of-light-energy.html)

Energy

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/solar.jpg

Efficiency is a problem with today's solar panels; they only collect about 20 percent of available light. Now, a University of Missouri engineer has developed a flexible solar sheet that captures more than 90 percent of available light, and he plans to make prototypes available to consumers within the next five years...

nondual
05-24-2011, 09:45 AM
May 23, 2011

Japan to Create a Nationwide Super Solar Array (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/japan-to-create-a-nationwide-super-solar-array.html)

Energy

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/japan-nationwide-solar-1-537x357.jpg

The Prime Minister of Japan, Naoto Kan, is about to announce to the G8 Summit in France his country’s plans to mandate that all buildings come equipped with solar panels by 2030. The announcement of this mandate comes in the wake of the March 11th earthquake and ensuing tsunami that caused a major nuclear crisis at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. This national solar array could help wean the country off of nuclear power and push them into a cleaner, safer future. Kan believes that this mandate will not only help Japan secure a clean energy future but will also help push the…

EldonG
05-24-2011, 01:47 PM
New solar product captures up to 95 percent of light energy (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/new-solar-product-captures-up-to-95-percent-of-light-energy.html)

Energy

Efficiency is a problem with today's solar panels; they only collect about 20 percent of available light. Now, a University of Missouri engineer has developed a flexible solar sheet that captures more than 90 percent of available light, and he plans to make prototypes available to consumers within the next five years...
If this proves effective, it will be revolutionary...but I remain skeptical.

nondual
06-01-2011, 06:52 AM
May 31, 2011

World’s First Solar-Powered Floating Island Opens in Seoul! (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/worlds-first-solar-powered-floating-island-opens-in-seoul.html)

Energy

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/seoul-viva-floating-island2-537x306.jpg

The citizens living off the Han River in Seoul, South Korea inaugurated the world’s largest floating island just last week with great excitement! With two more islands slated to open in September, the recently opened Viva is already drawing crowds en masse with its first-rate entertainment complex. The stunning structure includes a 700 seat convention hall, restaurants and arcades — all powered by solar energy. When the development is completed, the trio of islands will be linked together by twenty-three weather-proof chains. Seoul’s man-made islands differ from those common to Dubai, which…

nondual
06-01-2011, 06:57 AM
Solar-Powered Electric-Vehicle (EV) Charging Port unveiled in Connecticut (http://www.zeitnews.org/transportation/solar-powered-electric-vehicle-ev-charging-port-unveiled-in-connecticut.html)

By GE Energy

May 26, 2011

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Transportation/gesolar.jpg

Luis Ramírez, CEO of GE Energy Industrial Solutions today joins Connecticut Governor Dan Malloy and GE employees to unveil the GE Electric Vehicle (EV) Solar Carport in Plainville, Conn. The GE EV Solar Carport Project, one of the most expansive undertakings of its type in North America, uses GE's new smart EV Charging Stations to charge the electric vehicles hitting the streets of America.

“We see anywhere you park your electric vehicle as a great opportunity for charging infrastructure,” says Ramírez. “Now we also lead the future of electrification for electric vehicles with supplied power from the sun. The GE EV Solar Carport provides clean energy alternatives to oil and biofuels, expands our ability to capture the sun's energy and helps us deliver a viable EV ecosystem. This is a bright day for EV infrastructure development in Connecticut and the nation.”

The GE EV Solar Carport, a demonstration of the expansive horizon GE envisions for renewable energy within the EV ecosystem, produces the energy equivalent to power 20 homes per year. The average freestanding home uses approximately 7,000 to 10,000 kW hours per year. With greater than a 25-year lifespan, the EV Solar Carport will annually deliver 125 MW hours via 100 kW DC power. According to the Electric Drive Transportation Association, more than half of American drivers today travel less than 30 miles in a typical day and more than 75 percent travel less than 60 miles. EVs with a range of 50-100 miles could easily meet the daily needs of most customers.

More here. (http://www.zeitnews.org/transportation/solar-powered-electric-vehicle-ev-charging-port-unveiled-in-connecticut.html)

nondual
06-05-2011, 03:01 PM
Renault to install 450,000m2 of solar panels (http://www.gizmag.com/renault-solar-roof-project/18767/)

By Darren Quick (http://www.dcjunkies.com/author/darren-quick/)
20:54 May 31, 2011

http://images.gizmag.com/hero/renault-solar-roof.jpg (http://www.dcjunkies.com/renault-solar-roof-project/18767/picture/135088/)

Outdoing the likes of Ferrari (http://www.gizmag.com/ferrari-goes-solar/10802/) and Audi (http://www.gizmag.com/audi-expands-solar-capacity-of-ingolstadt-plant/17120/), which have already installed solar panels onto the roofs of their manufacturing plants, Renault has partnered with Gestamp Solar to launch what it says is the largest solar energy project in the automotive industry. The project will see solar panels eventually covering a total area of 450,000 m2 (4,843,760 sq ft) at Renault plants in France, generating 60 MW and cutting the company's CO2 emissions by 30,000 tons a year.


http://images.gizmag.com/inline/renault-solar-roof-0.jpg (http://www.dcjunkies.com/renault-solar-roof-project/18767/picture/135088/)


Installation of the solar panels on the roofs of the delivery and shipping centers at Renault's Douai, Maubeuge, Flins, Batilly, Sandouville and Cléon sites will begin this month, with completion scheduled for February 2012. Renault says that upon completion, the solar panels will cover an area equivalent to 63 football fields and generate enough electricity to power a town of 15,000 - although that's obviously not what it will be used for.

The solar roof project is part of Renault's plan to reduce its carbon footprint by 10 percent by 2013 and a further 10 percent by 2016. The company says it has already implemented a number of measures towards attaining these goals, including reducing energy consumption at its plants and diversifying the energy mix used to generate electricity with a particular focus on renewable energy sources.

nondual
06-08-2011, 03:53 PM
June 08, 2011

Apple Unveils Spherical Clean Energy Campus (http://www.zeitnews.org/applied-sciences/apple-unveils-spaceship-shaped-clean-energy-campus.html)

Applied Sciences

Steve Jobs made a quick visit to the Cupertino, California city council meeting on Tuesday to unveil Apple's plans for a new clean energy spaceship-shaped campus to be built in that city.

Jobs and Co. has designed a spherical space that not only fits more people onto the current plot of land, but manages to create 350% more green space in the process. Apple's new headquarters, if approved, will be fueled by its own low-emissions power plant and will use grid power only in the event of an on site emergency. Watch a video of Jobs unveiling the plans after the jump. From the air, the building is…


http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/AppliedSciences/spaceship.jpg

mrmeangenes
06-08-2011, 05:38 PM
Tell me: How does the Zeitgeist Movement differ from the 1920's - 1930's "Technocracy Movement" ?

Isn't it a continuation ?

nondual
06-10-2011, 08:25 AM
Tell me: How does the Zeitgeist Movement differ from the 1920's - 1930's "Technocracy Movement" ?

Isn't it a continuation ?
No, it's not a continuation. The Technocracy Movement was less democratic. Also, they just wanted to replace money with energy certificates, the Zeitgeist Movement advocates for a resource based economy where the Earth's resources, instead of the Fed's, are the measure by which we plan and build our future.

nondual
06-11-2011, 11:22 AM
Google Ups Research & Development to Make Solar Cheaper than Coal (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/google-ups-research-a-development-to-make-solar-cheaper-than-coal.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/google-solar-plant.jpg

It’s no mystery that Google is an internet powerhouse, but within the last couple of years, they have expanded their efforts to make big changes in the way we power our homes and cities. Their goal? To create a viable renewable energy option that is cheaper than coal, and their new patented solution just might do the trick. The concentrated solar technology makes use of a camera to adjust mirrors that optimize a given plant’s efficiency. The camera and a processing computer are located within the central tower of the solar thermal plant, and if a misalignment, or better (more efficient) angle is detected, then the mirrors are adjusted by robotic actuators.

Rather than focusing their efforts on lowering the cost of current solar technology, they have chosen to invest in the search for new solutions that could win the race against coal. In addition to hiring three new technology specialists for their R&D department, they’ve looked into grid power management strategies as well. Their PowerMeter Software coupled with their investment in various energy firms are further proof that Google is looking beyond ad-space to support their ever-growing company. In light of their $168 million dollar investment in the world’s largest solar tower in the Mojave Desert, it’s clear that Google’s sunny disposition towards renewables is here to stay.

Inhabitat (http://inhabitat.com/google-ups-research-development-to-make-solar-cheaper-than-coal/)

nondual
06-13-2011, 02:52 PM
June 13, 2011
New Superstrate Material Enables Flexible, Lightweight and Efficient Thin Film Solar Modules (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy-and-fuels-research/new-superstrate-material-enables-flexible-lightweight-and-efficient-thin-film-solar-modules.html)

Energy and Fuels Research

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/110609084806.jpg

DuPont™ Kapton® colorless polyimide film, a new material currently in development for use as a flexible superstrate for cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin film photovoltaic (PV) modules, has enabled a new world record for energy conversion efficiency. A team at Empa, the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, has demonstrated a conversion efficiency of 13.8 percent using the new colorless film, leapfrogging their previous record of 12.6 percent and nearing that of glass. Because Kapton® film is over 100 times thinner and 200 times lighter than glass typically used for PV,…

nondual
06-14-2011, 11:44 AM
Enfinity’s Beautiful Les Mées Solar Plants Are Capable of Powering 9,000 Homes (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/helen-morgan-enfinitys-beautiful-les-mees-solar-plants-are-capable-of-powering-9000-homes.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/enfinity-solar-farm-in-les-mees-france-2.jpg

Energy company Enfinity opened two beautiful new photovoltaic farms in Le Mées, France last month, proving that solar power can be an aesthetically-pleasing form of renewable energy. These enormous energy landscapes occupy over 80 acres of land and are capable of generating enough carbon-free electricity to power 9000 homes.

Enfinity‘s new solar farms span the lengths of the rolling French hills, while grass surrounds the panels, encouraging sheep to graze freely. Designed with the future in mind, the panels were installed without laying concrete foundations, so after two decades have passed and the solar panels are removed, a huge expanse of healthy grassland will remain.

Inhabitat (http://inhabitat.com/enfinitys-beautiful-les-mees-solar-plants-are-capable-of-powering-9000-homes/)

nondual
06-22-2011, 06:28 PM
Stanford team devises a better solar-powered water splitter (http://www.zeitnews.org/applied-sciences/stanford-team-devises-a-better-solar-powered-water-splitter.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/electrolyse.jpg

The process of splitting water into pure oxygen and clean-burning hydrogen fuel has long been the Holy Grail for clean-energy advocates as a method of large-scale energy storage, but the idea faces technical challenges. Stanford researchers may have solved one of the most important ones.

Solar energy is fine when the sun is shining. But what about at night or when it is cloudy? To be truly useful, sunshine must be converted to a form of energy that can be stored for use when the sun is hiding.

The notion of using sunshine to split water into oxygen and storable hydrogen fuel has been championed by clean-energy advocates for decades, but stubborn challenges have prevented adoption of an otherwise promising technology.

A team of Stanford researchers may have solved one of the most vexing scientific details blocking us from such a clean-energy future.

The team, led by materials science engineer Paul McIntyre and chemist Christopher Chidsey, has devised a robust silicon-based solar de that shows remarkable endurance in the highly corrosive environment inherent in the process of splitting water.

They revealed their progress in a recent paper published in the journal Nature Materials.

Conceptually, splitting water could not be simpler. Scientists have long known that applying a voltage across two electrodes submerged in water splits the water molecules into their component elements, oxygen and hydrogen.

From an environmental standpoint, the process is a dream: an electrochemical reaction whose only requirements are water and electricity and whose only byproducts are pure oxygen and hydrogen, a clean-burning fuel applicable in a promising new class of renewable energy applications. In fact, hydrogen is the cleanest burning chemical fuel known.

More here. (http://www.zeitnews.org/applied-sciences/stanford-team-devises-a-better-solar-powered-water-splitter.html)

nondual
06-22-2011, 06:31 PM
Pierrejean’s Solar-Powered LOU+LOU Yacht Cruises the Seven Seas (http://www.zeitnews.org/transportation/pierrejeans-solar-powered-loulou-yacht-cruises-the-seven-seas.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Transportation/yacht.jpg

A new yacht designed by Pierrejean Design Studios is taking green technology to the high seas. The LOU+LOU uses solar panels and a hybrid technology called “electrical motorization pools” to cruise completely silently up to 8 knots with a top speed of 25 knots. The technology is still in the experimental stage and is under wraps for now, but we love the idea that a yacht designer would create their own green technology for a custom craft like this one.

The LOU+LOU focuses on relaxation and tranquility inspired by nature: the five-deck boat is designed to be a floating spa that can endure a wide range of climates – from the hot Persian Gulf to cold northern temperatures. Other details we love include an aquarium integrated into the swimming pool and large underwater windows that link passengers directly to the sea itself.

Inhabitat (http://inhabitat.com/pierrejeans-loulou-yacht-uses-experimental-green-technology-to-cruise-the-seven-seas/)

nondual
06-22-2011, 06:33 PM
Researchers Create Tool to Put the Lid On Solar Power Fluctuations (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy-and-fuels-research/researchers-create-tool-to-put-the-lid-on-solar-power-fluctuations.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/110621141851.jpg

How does the power output from solar panels fluctuate when the clouds roll in? And can researchers predict these fluctuations? UC San Diego Professor Jan Kleissl and Matthew Lave, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the Jacobs School, have found the answer to these questions. They also have developed a software program that allows power grid managers to easily predict fluctuations in the solar grid caused by changes in the cloud cover. The program uses a solar variability law Lave discovered.

The finding comes at a time when the Obama administration is pushing for the creation of a smart power grid throughout the nation. The improved grid would allow for better use of renewable power sources, including wind and solar.


Also, more utilities have been increasing the amount of renewable energy sources they use to power homes and businesses. For example, Southern California Edison reported this month that it is adding more large-scale solar power plants to its grid and retooling its distribution system to accommodate the power fluctuations that will follow.

More here. (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy-and-fuels-research/researchers-create-tool-to-put-the-lid-on-solar-power-fluctuations.html)

nondual
06-29-2011, 03:52 PM
Australia's 400MW of Solar Plants to Nearly Double Generating Capacity (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/australias-400mw-of-solar-plants-to-nearly-double-generating-capacity.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/solar-dawn-australia-large-scale-solar.png

Grayhound Australia may be a fan of solar power, but for a country so blessed with abundant sunshine, Australia has not been a front runner when it comes to harnessing solar energy. All that may be set to change, as the country just announced two major projects that could nearly double the country's current solar capacity once up and operational.

Warren reported before on plans to build large-scale solar thermal plants in Australia, but ESI-Africa reports that the push for centralized, large-scale solar power may finally be really taking off down under. As part of a major push to produce 1000MW of power from solar, the Government announced that it had selected two of the four projects expected to reach this goal. Given that Australia had an estimated total of 500MW of solar generating capacity at the end of 2010, these projects look set to almost double the country's production by themselves.

Like the world's first 24/7 solar plant in Spain, the 250MW Solar Dawn project to be built in South West Queensland is designed to supply on demand power if and when needed, though in this case through a hybrid combination of concentrated solar and natural gas backup. More from the Solar Dawn website:

While designed as a standalone solar thermal power plant, Solar Dawn will have the added benefit of a gas boiler back-up system so electricity can be provided at any time. This will offer the ability to align daily electricity generation with demand, maximising the value of electricity generated - with zero emissions from the solar field and low emissions from the gas boilers.

The 150MW Moree Solar Farm in the New South Wales Tablelands near the town of Moree, by contrast, is a more traditional photovoltaic installation. Scheduled for construction in 2012, once completed the site will boast 650,000 PV panels. I guess how big is too big for solar power is not something Australians are concerned about just yet...

TreeHugger (http://www.treehugger.com/files/2011/06/australias-400mw-solar-plants.php?campaign=th_rss_science)

nondual
07-01-2011, 04:14 PM
A Giant, Man-Made Island Could Act as a Battery for Wind Power (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/a-giant-man-made-island-could-act-as-a-battery-for-wind-power.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/green-power-island-wind-energy-battery.jpg

Yesterday, I reported that Denmark may one day rely primarily on wind power -- an energy source that's all but impossible to use as a baseload. So the nation is looking to ensure that when the wind isn't blowing, the lights don't go off. Distributing that power between neighboring nations is one solution, but there's another, more radical option as well: Using a giant, man-made island to act as a battery. It's called Green Power Island.

The idea was announced last year, and the Danish researcher at Riso DTU notes that the concept is still under development. But it's still very much that: a concept.


Earth Techling explains how it would work:

The Green Power Island makes use of pumped hydro, a storage strategy that's already in wide use. Conventional pumped hydro systems use vertically separated reservoirs to utilize the power of water and gravity; during times of low demand (off peak), water is pumped using excess energy from the lower to the upper reservoir. As demand increases, the water is allowed to flow downhill into the lower reservoir, generating electricity in the process ...

Paludan has taken this strategy and given it a new twist ... His design makes use of seawater pumped into a lagoon-like reservoir built into an artificial island. When demand is low, pumps driven by wind turbines empty the reservoir. At peak periods, water is allowed to flow back into the reservoir, through turbines generating electricity to meet the rising demand. By positioning the reservoir within an existing body of water, the system removes the necessity of having to create two reservoirs at different heights.

Similar systems already exist, of course. France, for instance, uses energy generated from its nuke plants during low demand hours to pump water up a hill, and releasing it during peak hours.

Whether or not we see massive wind power batteries built into artificial islands off the coast, such designs make clear that storage solutions are out there -- and that it will indeed be possible to power societies entirely on renewables, as Denmark intends to do.

TreeHugger (http://www.treehugger.com/files/2011/06/gian-man-made-island-battery-wind-power.php?campaign=th_rss_science)

nondual
07-08-2011, 08:56 AM
Deserted UK Tin Mine Transformed into 1.4MW Solar Power Plant (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/deserted-uk-tin-mine-transformed-into-14mw-solar-power-plant.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/wheal-jane-solar-farm-537x357.jpg

An out of use tin mine in the south west of England is on its way to becoming a hotspot for renewable energy. Earlier today, more than 5,600 solar panels on the site were fired up by Solarcentury and UK-based solar developer Lightsource Renewable Energy. The new 1.4MW solar power plant will generate enough electricity to power more than 400 homes, and it is just one of many green energy developments planned for the site. The ultimate goal is to turn the abandoned mine, located at the historic Wheal Jane site in Cornwall, into the UK’s first earth science park to use renewable energy from solar, wind, hydro, and geothermal sources.

The new power plant covers a 7.2 acre plot of land, and it is one of the largest solar farms in the UK. Solarcentury designed and constructed the entire plant in less than two months, and local workers were employed to prepare the site and construct the building. Plans for the entire 60,000 sq. ft. site’s transformation into a sustainable business park are currently underway. (You can find details about all of the site’s renewable energy projects here.)


“To see a tin mine diversify into producing 21st century clean solar energy, provides an optimistic glimpse of where we’re now heading for our energy production,” said Derry Newman, CEO of Solarcentury. “Wheal Jane’s solar farm demonstrates that solar technology can contribute to our clean energy future, and quickly.”

Several other large solar arrays are underway and will be connected to the grid by the end of the month. A review by the UK government put a stop to funding for solar projects, making it unlikely that many more large scale plants will be started any time soon. This means that the solar plants being built this summer will play a critical role in the UK’s green energy production.

Inhabitat (http://inhabitat.com/deserted-uk-tin-mine-transformed-into-1-4mw-solar-power-plant/)

nondual
07-11-2011, 07:19 AM
Geothermal Industry to Get Boost from New Research (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/geothermal-industry-to-get-boost-from-new-research.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/110708160342.jpg

An ambitious University of Nevada, Reno project to understand and characterize geothermal potential at nearly 500 sites throughout the Great Basin is yielding a bounty of information for the geothermal industry to use in developing resources in Nevada, according to a report to the U.S. Department of Energy.

The project, based in the University's Bureau of Mines and Geology in the College of Science, is funded by a $1 million DOE grant from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. It has reached the one-year mark and is entering phase two, when five or six of the 250 identified potentially viable geothermal sites will be studied in more detail. Some of the studied sites will even have 3-D imaging to help those in the industry better understand geothermal processes and identify where to drill for the hot fluids.

The research aims to provide a catalogue of favorable structural elements, such as the pattern of faulting and models for geothermal systems and site-specific targeting using innovative techniques for fault analysis. The project will enhance exploration methodologies and reduce the risk of drilling nonproductive wells.

Jim Faulds, principal investigator for the project, geologist and research professor at the University of Nevada, Reno, has a team of six researchers and several graduate students working with him on various aspects of the project.

"Of the 463 geothermal sites to study, we've studied and characterized more than 250 in the past year, either using existing records or on-site analyses," Faulds said. "We'll continue to study more of the sites so we can develop better methods and tools for geothermal exploration. Most, about two-thirds, of the geothermal resources in the Great Basin are blind -- that is, there are no surface expressions, such as hot springs, to indicate what's perhaps 1,500 feet below the surface."

Better characterization of known geothermal systems is critical for new discoveries, targeting drilling sites and development, Faulds said. The success of modeling sites for exploration is limited without basic knowledge of which fault and fracture patterns, stress conditions, and stratigraphic intervals are most conducive to hosting geothermal reservoirs.

"The geothermal industry doesn't have the same depth of knowledge for geothermal exploration as the mineral and oil industries," he said. "Mineral and oil companies conducted extensive research years ago that helps them to characterize favorable settings and determine where to drill. With geothermal, it's studies like this that will enhance understanding of what controls hot fluids in the Earth's crust and thus provide an exploration basis for industry to use in discovering and developing resources."

Faulds and his team have defined a spectrum of favorable structural settings for geothermal systems in the Great Basin and completed a preliminary catalogue that interprets the structural setting of most its geothermal systems.

"This is the first attempt to broadly characterize and catalogue Great Basin geothermal systems in this way," he said.

In addition, Faulds has developed and taught a geothermal exploration class, published many papers on his work and presented his work at many conferences, including the World Geothermal Congress in Bali, Indonesia and the GEONZ2010 Geoscience-Geothermal Conference in Auckland, New Zealand.

Faulds also presented information from his study at a session of the National Geothermal Academy at the University of Nevada, Reno.

"We want to help the industry achieve acceptable levels of site-selection risk ahead of expensive drilling," he said. "This study costs only $1 million, but it could cost a company several million dollars for drilling at a single prospect in the hopes that they hit a good hot well. Our research will provide the baseline studies that are absolutely needed if Nevada is going to become the Saudi Arabia of geothermal."

Science Daily (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110708160342.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily+%28ScienceDaily% 3A+Latest+Science+News%29)

nondual
07-13-2011, 10:44 AM
Gemasolar solar thermal power plant supplies power for 24 hours straight (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/gemasolar-solar-thermal-power-plant-supplies-power-for-24-hours-straight.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/gemasolar.jpg

Last week, the Gemasolar power plant near Seville, Spain, became the first commercial solar thermal power plant to supply uninterrupted power for a full 24 hours, according to builders Torresol Energy. In contrast to photovoltaic solar cells, which use the sun’s light to generate electricity, solar thermal plants use the sun’s heat to run steam turbines and generate electricity. One of the biggest advantages of using heat is that it can be stored more easily than light, allowing for electricity production to continue even after the sun sets.

The Gemasolar 19.9-MW Concentrated Solar Power system is a “power tower” plant, consisting of an array of 2,650 heliostats (mirrors) that aim solar radiation at the top of a 140-m (450-ft) central tower. The radiation heats molten salts that circulate inside the tower to temperatures of more than 500 °C (932 °F). The hot molten salts are then stored in tanks that are specially designed to maintain the high temperatures. This cutting-edge heat storage system enables the power plant to run steam turbines and generate electricity for up to 15 hours without any incoming solar radiation.

Gemasolar’s ability to generate 24 hours of electricity marks an important step toward demonstrating the reliability of solar technology, which is one of the industry’s biggest challenges. In addition to providing continuous power on cloudy days and at night, Gemasolar’s storage capacity makes it possible to manage the supply of electricity sent to the network and respond to spikes in demand. As noted in a press release from Torresol Energy, “The reliability of solar energy becomes comparable to that of conventional fossil-fuel power plants, which is decisive as the demand for renewable energy increases.”

As the company explained, Gemasolar had only been operating commercially for one month prior to its 24-hour run.


"Gemasolar achieved optimal performance in its systems in the last week of June,” said Diego Ramírez, Director of Production at Torresol Energy. “The high performance of the installations coincided with several days of excellent solar radiation which made it possible for the hot-salt storage tank to reach full capacity. We're hoping that in the next few days our supply to the network will reach an average of 20 hours a day."

The power generated by Gemasolar is sent to a nearby power substation, where it is injected into the grid. Torresol Energy estimates that Gemasolar will generate 110 GWh of electricity per year, enough to power about 25,000 homes, as well as reduce carbon dioxide emissions by more than 30,000 tons per year.

Torresol Energy is a joint venture between Abu Dhabi’s future energy and clean technology company Masdar and the leading Spanish engineering and construction company SENER.

PhysOrg (http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-07-gemasolar-solar-thermal-power-hours.html)

nondual
07-13-2011, 10:48 AM
Research update: New way to store sun's heat (http://www.zeitnews.org/nanotechnology/research-update-new-way-to-store-suns-heat.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Nanotechnology/researchupda.jpg

A novel application of carbon nanotubes, developed by MIT researchers, shows promise as an innovative approach to storing solar energy for use whenever it’s needed.

Storing the sun’s heat in chemical form — rather than converting it to electricity or storing the heat itself in a heavily insulated container — has significant advantages, since in principle the chemical material can be stored for long periods of time without losing any of its stored energy. The problem with that approach has been that until now the chemicals needed to perform this conversion and storage either degraded within a few cycles, or included the element ruthenium, which is rare and expensive.

Last year, MIT associate professor Jeffrey Grossman and four co-authors figured out exactly how fulvalene diruthenium — known to scientists as the best chemical for reversibly storing solar energy, since it did not degrade — was able to accomplish this feat. Grossman said at the time that better understanding this process could make it easier to search for other compounds, made of abundant and inexpensive materials, which could be used in the same way.

Now, he and postdoc Alexie Kolpak have succeeded in doing just that. A paper describing their new findings has just been published online in the journal Nano Letters, and will appear in print in a forthcoming issue.

The new material found by Grossman and Kolpak is made using carbon nanotubes, tiny tubular structures of pure carbon, in combination with a compound called azobenzene. The resulting molecules, produced using nanoscale templates to shape and constrain their physical structure, gain “new properties that aren’t available” in the separate materials, says Grossman, the Carl Richard Soderberg Associate Professor of Power Engineering.

Not only is this new chemical system less expensive than the earlier ruthenium-containing compound, but it also is vastly more efficient at storing energy in a given amount of space — about 10,000 times higher in volumetric energy density, Kolpak says — making its energy density comparable to lithium-ion batteries. By using nanofabrication methods, “you can control [the molecules’] interactions, increasing the amount of energy they can store and the length of time for which they can store it — and most importantly, you can control both independently,” she says.
Thermo-chemical storage of solar energy uses a molecule whose structure changes when exposed to sunlight, and can remain stable in that form indefinitely. Then, when nudged by a stimulus — a catalyst, a small temperature change, a flash of light — it can quickly snap back to its other form, releasing its stored energy in a burst of heat. Grossman describes it as creating a rechargeable heat battery with a long shelf life, like a conventional battery.

One of the great advantages of the new approach to harnessing solar energy, Grossman says, is that it simplifies the process by combining energy harvesting and storage into a single step. “You’ve got a material that both converts and stores energy,” he says. “It’s robust, it doesn’t degrade, and it’s cheap.” One limitation, however, is that while this process is useful for heating applications, to produce electricity would require another conversion step, using thermoelectric devices or producing steam to run a generator.
While the new work shows the energy-storage capability of a specific type of molecule — azobenzene-functionalized carbon nanotubes — Grossman says the way the material was designed involves “a general concept that can be applied to many new materials.” Many of these have already been synthesized by other researchers for different applications, and would simply need to have their properties fine-tuned for solar thermal storage.

The key to controlling solar thermal storage is an energy barrier separating the two stable states the molecule can adopt; the detailed understanding of that barrier was central to Grossman’s earlier research on fulvalene dirunthenium, accounting for its long-term stability. Too low a barrier, and the molecule would return too easily to its “uncharged” state, failing to store energy for long periods; if the barrier were too high, it would not be able to easily release its energy when needed. “The barrier has to be optimized,” Grossman says.

Already, the team is “very actively looking at a range of new materials,” he says. While they have already identified the one very promising material described in this paper, he says, “I see this as the tip of the iceberg. We’re pretty jazzed up about it.”

Yosuke Kanai, assistant professor of chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, says “the idea of reversibly storing solar energy in chemical bonds is gaining a lot of attention these days. The novelty of this work is how these authors have shown that the energy density can be significantly increased by using carbon nanotubes as nanoscale templates. This innovative idea also opens up an interesting avenue for tailoring already-known photoactive molecules for solar thermal fuels and storage in general.”

PhysOrg (http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-07-sun.html)

nondual
07-18-2011, 06:52 AM
"Aluminum-Celmet" could boost electric vehicle range by 300%

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Transportation/prs924.jpg

Sumitomo Electric Industries (SEI) is the Japanese company behind an innovation that could potentially lead to a serious rise in the capabilities of electric vehicles.

If you haven't heard of SEI, that's okay. Please allow us to fill you in. SEI is a manufacturer of electric wire and optical fiber cable that recently developed a porous aluminum called "Aluminum-Celmet." The company says the lightweight metal can be integrated into lithium-ion batteries and claims that Aluminum-Celmet's three-dimensional structure forms interconnected, spherical pores that somehow nearly triple battery capacity.

In addition, Aluminum-Celmet's electrical resistance is supposedly lower that of Celmet, a proprietary metal derived from nickel and currently used in SEI's NiMH batteries. By replacing the conventional aluminum-copper foils within a li-ion battery with its patented Aluminum-Celmet, the company says battery capacity can jump by up to 300 percent.

SEI is looking to set up an Aluminum-Celmet assembly line at its Osaka Works facility in Japan and hopes to move to mass production of the patented metal soon. We'd like to see that, too, if these claims turn out to be true.

Autoblog Green (http://green.autoblog.com/2011/07/14/sumitomo-aluminum-celmet-boost-electric-vehicle-range/)

nondual
07-23-2011, 06:22 AM
Twice the height of the Empire State - EnviroMission plans massive solar tower for Arizona (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/twice-the-height-of-the-empire-state-enviromission-plans-massive-solar-tower-for-arizona.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/enviromission-solar-tower-arizona-power.jpg

An ambitious solar energy project on a massive scale is about to get underway in the Arizona desert. EnviroMission is undergoing land acquisition and site-specific engineering to build its first full-scale solar tower - and when we say full-scale, we mean it! The mammoth 800-plus meter (2625 ft) tall tower will instantly become one of the world's tallest buildings. Its 200-megawatt power generation capacity will reliably feed the grid with enough power for 150,000 US homes, and once it's built, it can be expected to more or less sit there producing clean, renewable power with virtually no maintenance until it's more than 80 years old. In the video after the jump, EnviroMission CEO Roger Davey explains the solar tower technology, the Arizona project and why he couldn't get it built at home in Australia.

How Solar Towers Work

Enviromission's solar tower is a simple idea taken to gigantic proportions. The sun beats down on a large covered greenhouse area at the bottom, warming the air underneath it. Hot air wants to rise, so there's a central point for it to rush towards and escape; the tower in the middle. And there's a bunch of turbines at the base of the tower that generate electricity from that natural updraft.

It's hard to envisage that sort of system working effectively until you tweak the temperature variables and scale the whole thing up. Put this tower in a hot desert area, where the daytime surface temperature sits at around 40 degrees Celsius (104 F), and add in the greenhouse effect and you've got a temperature under your collector somewhere around 80-90 degrees (176-194 F). Scale your collector greenhouse out to a several hundred-meter radius around the tower, and you're generating a substantial volume of hot air.


Then, raise that tower up so that it's hundreds of meters in the air - because for every hundred metres you go up from the surface, the ambient temperature drops by about 1 degree. The greater the temperature differential, the harder the tower sucks up that hot air at the bottom - and the more energy you can generate through the turbines.

The advantages of this kind of power source are clear:


*Because it works on temperature differential, not absolute temperature, it works in any weather;

*Because the heat of the day warms the ground up so much, it continues working at night;

*Because you want large tracts of hot, dry land for best results, you can build it on more or less useless land in the desert;

*It requires virtually no maintenance - apart from a bit of turbine servicing now and then, the tower "just works" once it's going, and lasts as long as its structure stays standing;

*It uses no 'feed stock' - no coal, no uranium, nothing but air and sunlight;

*It emits absolutely no pollution - the only emission is warm air at the top of the tower. In fact, because you're creating a greenhouse underneath, it actually turns out to be remarkably good for growing vegetation under there.

More on Gizmag (http://www.gizmag.com/enviromission-solar-tower-arizona-clean-energy-renewable/19287/)

OldMercsRule
07-23-2011, 11:54 PM
Twice the height of the Empire State - EnviroMission plans massive solar tower for Arizona (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/twice-the-height-of-the-empire-state-enviromission-plans-massive-solar-tower-for-arizona.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/enviromission-solar-tower-arizona-power.jpg

An ambitious solar energy project on a massive scale is about to get underway in the Arizona desert. EnviroMission is undergoing land acquisition and site-specific engineering to build its first full-scale solar tower - and when we say full-scale, we mean it! The mammoth 800-plus meter (2625 ft) tall tower will instantly become one of the world's tallest buildings. Its 200-megawatt power generation capacity will reliably feed the grid with enough power for 150,000 US homes, and once it's built, it can be expected to more or less sit there producing clean, renewable power with virtually no maintenance until it's more than 80 years old. In the video after the jump, EnviroMission CEO Roger Davey explains the solar tower technology, the Arizona project and why he couldn't get it built at home in Australia.

How Solar Towers Work

Enviromission's solar tower is a simple idea taken to gigantic proportions. The sun beats down on a large covered greenhouse area at the bottom, warming the air underneath it. Hot air wants to rise, so there's a central point for it to rush towards and escape; the tower in the middle. And there's a bunch of turbines at the base of the tower that generate electricity from that natural updraft.

It's hard to envisage that sort of system working effectively until you tweak the temperature variables and scale the whole thing up. Put this tower in a hot desert area, where the daytime surface temperature sits at around 40 degrees Celsius (104 F), and add in the greenhouse effect and you've got a temperature under your collector somewhere around 80-90 degrees (176-194 F). Scale your collector greenhouse out to a several hundred-meter radius around the tower, and you're generating a substantial volume of hot air.


Then, raise that tower up so that it's hundreds of meters in the air - because for every hundred metres you go up from the surface, the ambient temperature drops by about 1 degree. The greater the temperature differential, the harder the tower sucks up that hot air at the bottom - and the more energy you can generate through the turbines.

The advantages of this kind of power source are clear:


*Because it works on temperature differential, not absolute temperature, it works in any weather;

*Because the heat of the day warms the ground up so much, it continues working at night;

*Because you want large tracts of hot, dry land for best results, you can build it on more or less useless land in the desert;

*It requires virtually no maintenance - apart from a bit of turbine servicing now and then, the tower "just works" once it's going, and lasts as long as its structure stays standing;

*It uses no 'feed stock' - no coal, no uranium, nothing but air and sunlight;

*It emits absolutely no pollution - the only emission is warm air at the top of the tower. In fact, because you're creating a greenhouse underneath, it actually turns out to be remarkably good for growing vegetation under there.

More on Gizmag (http://www.gizmag.com/enviromission-solar-tower-arizona-clean-energy-renewable/19287/)

That looks fantastic. Very interesting Thank You.

nondual
08-06-2011, 01:50 PM
Solar Energy: Smart Energy Management Systems Help Store Power for Later Use (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/solar-energy-smart-energy-management-systems-help-store-power-for-later-use.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/110802085823.jpg

Storing power is complicated and expensive, but very often, especially far away from the regular power grids, there is no way around large batteries for grid-independent electricity consumers. It would make more sense to use the electricity when it is generated. This becomes possible with the help of a smart energy management system.

For fruits, cereals and leguminous plants such as oranges, wheat, beans and olives to grow in hot and dry climates, they must be irrigated regularly. And very often the water used comes from deep wells. In Egypt, many farmers currently use diesel generators to water their fields. A model project in Upper Egypt, in Wadi El Natrun, shows that other methods are possible. Here, a photovoltaic stand-alone system takes care of irrigating a wheat field. Concentrator photovoltaic system (CPV) modules -- which, due to their higher degree of effectiveness and their particular construction, require far less space than traditional PV modules -- supply the energy, while Fresnel lenses concentrate the rays of the sun onto pinhead-sized multi-junction solar cells.

With the aid of a tracking motor, the CPV cells, which are attached to a pillar, follow the sun precisely to achieve an optimized yield of solar light. They supply the energy for a submersible pump that pumps the water up from a well that is 105 feet deep and for a small desalination unit that satisfies farmers' potable water requirements. The CPV cells also supply the energy for PV-module trackers, the monitoring and control system and an air-conditioning unit that cools the utility room of the facility.

In order to make the complete system as inexpensive as possible, the developers largely did without expensive batteries for the intermediate storage of the energy gained from the solar cells. "Where there is no public power grid, the PV systems currently operate cost-effectively, due to their low operating costs. The only problems are posed by the high initial costs of the investment, in which the batteries play a substantial role," explained Jakob Wachtel from the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE in Freiburg, Germany.

"By immediately using the largest share of the energy that is generated we can save on expensive storage media capacities," adds his colleague, Alexander Schies. A sophisticated energy management system monitors the generation of energy and ensures that it immediately goes where it is needed at the moment, such as the submersible pump to fill up the water reservoir, the irrigation pump when it is time to irrigate the field or the desalination unit. Developers only store some of the solar energy in a relatively small battery to operate the CPV tracker and the measuring system. "We need this reserve, in particular, to align the CPV modules in the morning to their morning position," explained Jakob Wachtel. Unlike traditional solar modules made of silicon, the concentrating photovoltaic systems provide energy only if they are precisely aligned to the sun.

All of the irrigation system components have micro-controllers that transmit their status data to the energy management system that controls them. The Universal Energy Supply Protocol (UESP) developed at the ISE was designed especially for this type of energy and load management and is the form of the communication of choice. Currently, the UESP is being integrated into the CANopen protocol CiA454 of the CiA (CAN in Automation) organization as an application profile for grid-independent energy supply systems. CANopen is rather prevalent in automation technology and has established itself as the standard for the control of electrical devices. "All systems that work with these kinds of protocols can be expanded at any time with devices that 'understand' CANopen or UESP -- completely independent of the manufacturer. This is practical if a defective component has to be replaced," emphasized Alexander Schies. This, too, contributes to the savings. At the same time it simplifies the maintenance and further development of the stand-alone CPV system.

Science Daily (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110802085823.htm)

nondual
08-14-2011, 11:12 AM
Energy Storage for Solar Power (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/energy-storage-for-solar-power.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/brightsource_x220.jpg

BrightSource Energy has become the latest solar thermal power company to develop a system for generating power when the sun isn't shining. The company says the technology can lower the cost of solar power and make it more reliable, helping it compete with conventional sources of electricity.

The company, based in Oakland, California, is building one of the world's largest solar thermal power plants. The 392-megawatt solar plant in Ivanpah, California, however, will not include the storage technology. Instead, BrightSource is working with utilities to determine which future projects could best benefit from storage.

Solar thermal systems use mirrors to focus sunlight, generating temperatures high enough to produce steam to drive a turbine. One of the advantages of the solar thermal approach, versus conventional photovoltaics that convert sunlight directly into electricity, is that heat can be stored cheaply and used when needed to generate electricity. In all solar thermal plants, some heat is stored in the fluids circulating through the system. This evens out any short fluctuations in sunlight and lets the plant generate electricity for some time after the sun goes down. But adding storage systems would let the plant ride out longer periods of cloud cover and generate power well into, or even throughout, the night. Such long-term storage could be needed if solar is to provide a large share of the total power supply.

BrightSource is using a variation on an approach to storage that's a decade old: heating up a molten salt—typically, a combination of sodium and potassium nitride—and then storing it in a tank. To generate electricity, the molten salt is pumped through a heat exchanger to generate steam. BrightSource CEO John Woolard says one big factor in making this technology economically attractive is the use of power towers—in which mirrors focus sunlight on a central tower—that generate higher temperatures than other solar thermal designs. That higher temperature makes it possible to store more energy using a smaller amount of molten salt. "It's a much more efficient system and much more cost effective, overall," he says.

Storage allows a thermal power plant to run more hours in the day, so they can more quickly recover the cost of expensive steam turbines and generators. Woolard says that while a solar thermal plant without storage can generate electricity about 2,700 hours a year, BrightSource's storage system increases that to 4,300 hours. The increased output more than offsets the added cost of storage. A study from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, estimates that storage in a power tower system could cut costs per kilowatt hour by 25 to 30 percent.

At least two other companies are pairing power tower technologies with molten salt storage. Torresol Energy has built such a system at a 19.9-megawatt solar thermal power plant near Seville, Spain, and demonstrated that it can run the power plant through the night using stored heat. In the United States, Solar Reserve plans to build a power tower with molten salt storage in Riverside County, California.

In addition to lowering costs, the storage system also improves the economics of solar thermal power by increasing the price that utilities are willing to pay for the electricity. Storage decreases the need for utilities to invest in backup power for smoothing out variations in power. Utilities will also pay a higher price for power they can count on at any given moment to make up for increases in demand. And the storage system lets the plant sell power into the evening, when power prices are higher in some locations.

Storage technology may be essential if solar thermal technology is to compete with photovoltaic solar panels, which have been coming down in price, says Mark Mehos, an NREL researcher. "BrightSource plants that don't have energy storage probably generate electricity at about the same price as a plant that uses photovoltaics," he says. "So all things being equal, they would like to be able to deliver that at a higher value."


Technology Review (http://www.technologyreview.com/energy/38257/page1/)

nondual
08-29-2011, 11:26 AM
Solar Company Breaks Record for Screen-Printed Solar Cell Efficiency (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/solar-company-breaks-record-for-screen-printed-solar-cell-efficiency.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/schott-solar-sunrise-e1314299601197.jpg

Over the years, new solar technology has broken a few records including solar energy concentration and solar vehicular speed. However this week, SCHOTT Solar announced that they had broken the record for screen-printed solar cell efficiency, after creating the world’s first monocrystalline screen-printed solar cell with a conversion efficiency of 20.2%.

Previously the record efficiency generated by a solar cell was 17.6% and was done through the use of multicrystalline solar cells. It is this method that SHOTT Solar’s Dr. Axel Metz, head of solar cell research and development at SCHOTT Solar, acknowledges as the greatest contributing factor for his team’s record.


“We’ve been concentrating on the development of monocrystalline cells since the start of 2011,” he said. “We had three years of experience with the multicrystalline cells to carry over to the monocrystalline concept.”


The team’s initial trials can created cell efficiency of over 19%, but this wasn’t deemed good enough. After working with the Schmid Group from Freudenstadt (and with further funding), the SCHOTT team optimized the cell’s surface with Schmid’s production-established selective emitter technology and their own PERC (Passsivated Emitter and Rear Contacts) technology. With these two solutions, solar efficiency was increased to over 20%. Their results were confirmed by the Fraunhofer ISE in Freiburg, another research institute, who provided an independent measurement.

Inhabitat (http://inhabitat.com/schott-solar-company-breaks-record-for-screen-printed-solar-cell-efficiency/)

nondual
09-01-2011, 07:57 AM
Breakthrough in hydrogen fuel cells: Chemists develop way to safely store, extract hydrogen (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/breakthrough-in-hydrogen-fuel-cells-chemists-develop-way-to-safely-store-extract-hydrogen.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/1-breakthrough.gif

A team of USC scientists has developed a robust, efficient method of using hydrogen as a fuel source.

Hydrogen makes a great fuel because of it can easily be converted to electricity in a fuel cell and because it is carbon free. The downside of hydrogen is that, because it is a gas, it can only be stored in high pressure or cryogenic tanks.

In a vehicle with a tank full of hydrogen, "if you got into a wreck, you'd have a problem," said Travis Williams, assistant professor of chemistry at the USC Dornsife College.

A possible solution is to store hydrogen in a safe chemical form. Earlier this year, Williams and his team figured out a way to release hydrogen from an innocuous chemical material — a nitrogen-boron complex, ammonia borane — that can be stored as a stable solid.

Now the team has developed a catalyst system that releases enough hydrogen from its storage in ammonia borane to make it usable as a fuel source. Moreover, the system is air-stable and re-usable, unlike other systems for hydrogen storage on boron and metal hydrides.

The research was published this month in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

"Ours is the first game in town for reusable, air stabile ammonia borane dehydrogenation," Williams said, adding that the USC Stevens Institute is in the process of patenting the system.

The system is sufficiently lightweight and efficient to have potential fuel applications ranging from motor-driven cycles to small aircraft, he said.

PhysOrg.com (http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-08-breakthrough-hydrogen-fuel-cells-chemists.html)

G_
09-02-2011, 07:36 PM
One thing should be understood by all those,who are skeptical (to say the very least) of renewable energy:If the same skepticism would have been brought up against fossil energy back in their infancy,we wouldn´t have developed the society we have today.
Renewable energy is the energy of the future and we better be on that train or other will be!

nondual
09-04-2011, 06:19 PM
Double-Skinned ARCA-Regler Facility is Powered by Geothermal Energy (http://www.zeitnews.org/applied-sciences/double-skinned-arca-regler-facility-is-powered-by-geothermal-energy.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/block.jpg

When valve manufacturers ARCA-Regler purchased a plot of land in a residential neighborhood in Germany, they set about planning an office and production facility that wouldn’t intrude on the local architecture. Designed by Anin Jeromin Fitilidis and Partners, the mixed-use facility is segmented into two parts that curve inoffensively out of the landscape. The double-skinned façade provides a comfortable and energy-efficient working environment.

Located along a disused railway, the glimmering aerodynamic building reflects ARCA’s high tech design identity while furthering its environmental interests. The front portion of the building has walls of floor-to-ceiling glass which flood the offices housed in the interior with natural light from all sides.

The curvaceous metal skin which wraps around the glass is perforated on the sides to filter the sunlight. The exterior layer of the skin is printed with a pattern designed to mitigate the building’s solar exposure. 55% of the surface is printed, which gives the skin an air of transparency while protecting the interior from solar gain. The skin also extends beyond the interior box of glass, providing shelter from rain and wind for employees to take a break year round. The solid, metallic section of the complex mimics the curvature of the double skinned office, and it houses ARCA’s production facility.

Both sections of the facility are powered with renewable energy. The building is climate controlled using a field of geothermic probes, which reduce the need for heating and cooling.

Anin Jeromin Fitilidis and Partners’ resulting facility is an environmentally conscious and modern looking headquarters that keeps the residential area from looking too industrial.


+ Anin Jeromin Fitilidis and Partners

Via Architizer

Inhabitat (http://inhabitat.com/double-skinned-arca-regler-facility-powered-by-geothermic-probes/)

nondual
09-04-2011, 06:24 PM
Harry Reid Announces the World’s First Hybrid Solar-Geothermal Power Plant (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/harry-reid-announces-the-worlds-first-hybrid-solar-geothermal-power-plant.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/reid-geothermal-solar-22-537x335.jpg

Nevada Senator Harry Reid began his time as host of the fourth National Clean Energy Summit in Las Vegas yesterday by announcing the world’s first hybrid solar-geothermal power plant — to be built in his state! The plant will be located on the site of the current Stillwater Geothermal Plant and though the solar component is small, it is a great leap forward in the combining of renewable energy sources. The addition of solar panels to the geothermal power plant will take about a year to complete and once finished, power from the facility will be sold to NV Energy.

The new solar-geothermal hybrid power plant is being built by Enel, one of the world’s largest power plant developers and is being used as a test run for more projects like it. The solar-retrofit of the Stillwater Geothermal Plant is supported by Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, who noted in a press conference about the new project that “this is an incredible new technology that can be used across the country.” The plant will create 250 jobs in the local area.


In talks with reporters before the Summit, Reid said “our dependence on foreign oil is making our nation less secure, and is certainly damaging the health of our citizens.” Vice President Joe Biden was also on hand at the Summit in support of clean energy goals. “There’s no reason why the United States can’t lead the world in clean energy,” he said. He noted that the United States could become a leader in the production of renewable energy and renewable energy technologies. If we don’t push forward on these innovations, he noted, the alternative is “spending $300 billion a year on imported oil, and sending the money to nations that don’t like us very much. If we don’t lead in clean energy, we’ll follow. I’d hate to see us replace the importing of foreign oil with the importing of foreign technology.”

Inhabitat (http://inhabitat.com/harry-reid-announces-the-worlds-first-hybrid-solar-geothermal-power-plant/)

nondual
09-10-2011, 05:01 AM
Japanese breakthrough will make wind power cheaper than nuclear (http://www.mnn.com/green-tech/research-innovations/blogs/japanese-breakthrough-will-make-wind-power-cheaper-than-nuclea)

http://www.mnn.com/sites/default/files/wind-lens_0.jpg

A surprising aerodynamic innovation in wind turbine design called the 'wind lens' could triple the output of a typical wind turbine, making it less costly than nuclear power.

The International Clean Energy Analysis (ICEA) gateway estimates (http://en.openei.org/wiki/United_States) that the U.S. possesses 2.2 million km2 of high wind potential (Class 3-7 winds) — about 850,000 square miles of land that could yield high levels of wind energy. This makes the U.S. something of a Saudi Arabia for wind energy, ranked third in the world for total wind energy potential.

Let's say we developed just 20 percent of those wind resources — 170,000 square miles (440,000 km2) or an area roughly 1/4 the size of Alaska — we could produce a whopping 8.7 billion megawatt hours of electricity each year (based on a theoretical conversion of six 1.5 MW turbines per km2 and an average output of 25 percent. (1.5 MW x 365 days x 24 hrs x 25% = 3,285 MWh's).

The United States uses about 26.6 billion MWh's, so at the above rate we could satisfy a full one-third of our total annual energy needs. (Of course, this assumes the concurrent deployment of a nationwide Smart Grid (http://www.mnn.com/eco-glossary/smart-grid) that could store and disburse the variable sources of wind power (http://www.mnn.com/eco-glossary/wind-power) as needed using a variety of technologies — gas or coal peaking, utility scale storage via batteries or fly-wheels, etc).

Now what if a breakthrough came along that potentially tripled the energy output of those turbines? You see where I'm going. We could in theory supply the TOTAL annual energy needs of the U.S. simply by exploiting 20 percent of our available wind resources.

Well, such a breakthrough has been made, and it's called the "wind lens.

ifF-MOuzM_s

More here (http://www.mnn.com/green-tech/research-innovations/blogs/japanese-breakthrough-will-make-wind-power-cheaper-than-nuclea).

G_
09-10-2011, 10:16 AM
Japanese breakthrough will make wind power cheaper than nuclear (http://www.mnn.com/green-tech/research-innovations/blogs/japanese-breakthrough-will-make-wind-power-cheaper-than-nuclea)

http://www.mnn.com/sites/default/files/wind-lens_0.jpg

A surprising aerodynamic innovation in wind turbine design called the 'wind lens' could triple the output of a typical wind turbine, making it less costly than nuclear power.

The International Clean Energy Analysis (ICEA) gateway estimates (http://en.openei.org/wiki/United_States) that the U.S. possesses 2.2 million km2 of high wind potential (Class 3-7 winds) — about 850,000 square miles of land that could yield high levels of wind energy. This makes the U.S. something of a Saudi Arabia for wind energy, ranked third in the world for total wind energy potential.

Let's say we developed just 20 percent of those wind resources — 170,000 square miles (440,000 km2) or an area roughly 1/4 the size of Alaska — we could produce a whopping 8.7 billion megawatt hours of electricity each year (based on a theoretical conversion of six 1.5 MW turbines per km2 and an average output of 25 percent. (1.5 MW x 365 days x 24 hrs x 25% = 3,285 MWh's).

The United States uses about 26.6 billion MWh's, so at the above rate we could satisfy a full one-third of our total annual energy needs. (Of course, this assumes the concurrent deployment of a nationwide Smart Grid (http://www.mnn.com/eco-glossary/smart-grid) that could store and disburse the variable sources of wind power (http://www.mnn.com/eco-glossary/wind-power) as needed using a variety of technologies — gas or coal peaking, utility scale storage via batteries or fly-wheels, etc).

Now what if a breakthrough came along that potentially tripled the energy output of those turbines? You see where I'm going. We could in theory supply the TOTAL annual energy needs of the U.S. simply by exploiting 20 percent of our available wind resources.

Well, such a breakthrough has been made, and it's called the "wind lens.

ifF-MOuzM_s

More here (http://www.mnn.com/green-tech/research-innovations/blogs/japanese-breakthrough-will-make-wind-power-cheaper-than-nuclea).
I KNEW IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Like with every other technology in the history of mankind,it´s just a question of time and afford to IMPROVE technology and make it more efficient.
First gasoline engines:2 liter displacement and 0.5 hp power.I would like to see what would have happened when conservatives back than would have said:"that´s nonsense" or "go and wind up your...... but leave the world alone with your silly technology"
Wind turbines have been improved big time over the last 30 years and will continue to do so and a break through like this shows us just how much better we can (and should) do in order to not miss this future technology!
Thank you for posting this!!

nondual
09-10-2011, 04:33 PM
Good bye oil! :hi:

:D

G_
09-13-2011, 05:42 PM
Good bye oil! :hi:

:D
I wouldn´t necessarily say "good by" but rather:"now we can use it for all the GOOD things,we produce from it without the fear of running out of it"!
Plastic syringes for example have made it obsolete to wash out glass syringes and eliminated a whole lot of transmitted diseases in hospitals ,or a billion other products that are made today of oil and that enabled us to improve our civilization....
In fact,oil is FA to valuable to be just burned up,so mummy can drive two blocks to pick up the kids!

G_
09-13-2011, 05:48 PM
The next step would have to be to decrease inner friction in the generators (something like an oil-film bearing,found today in gasoline engines)and better brushes.
Well,it is picking up and we should be very happy about it!

nondual
09-19-2011, 08:33 AM
Sun-Free Photovoltaics: Materials Engineered to Give Off Precisely Tuned Wavelengths of Light When Heated (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy-and-fuels-research/sun-free-photovoltaics-materials-engineered-to-give-off-precisely-tuned-wavelengths-of-light-when-heated.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/110730180245.jpg

A new photovoltaic energy-conversion system developed at MIT can be powered solely by heat, generating electricity with no sunlight at all. While the principle involved is not new, a novel way of engineering the surface of a material to convert heat into precisely tuned wavelengths of light -- selected to match the wavelengths that photovoltaic cells can best convert to electricity -- makes the new system much more efficient than previous versions.

The key to this fine-tuned light emission, described in the journal Physical Review A, lies in a material with billions of nanoscale pits etched on its surface. When the material absorbs heat -- whether from the sun, a hydrocarbon fuel, a decaying radioisotope or any other source -- the pitted surface radiates energy primarily at these carefully chosen wavelengths.

Based on that technology, MIT researchers have made a button-sized power generator fueled by butane that can run three times longer than a lithium-ion battery of the same weight; the device can then be recharged instantly, just by snapping in a tiny cartridge of fresh fuel. Another device, powered by a radioisotope that steadily produces heat from radioactive decay, could generate electricity for 30 years without refueling or servicing -- an ideal source of electricity for spacecraft headed on long missions away from the sun.

According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, 92 percent of all the energy we use involves converting heat into mechanical energy, and then often into electricity -- such as using fuel to boil water to turn a turbine, which is attached to a generator. But today's mechanical systems have relatively low efficiency, and can't be scaled down to the small sizes needed for devices such as sensors, smartphones or medical monitors.

"Being able to convert heat from various sources into electricity without moving parts would bring huge benefits," says Ivan Celanovic ScD '06, research engineer in MIT's Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies (ISN), "especially if we could do it efficiently, relatively inexpensively and on a small scale."

It has long been known that photovoltaic (PV) cells needn't always run on sunlight. Half a century ago, researchers developed thermophotovoltaics (TPV), which couple a PV cell with any source of heat: A burning hydrocarbon, for example, heats up a material called the thermal emitter, which radiates heat and light onto the PV diode, generating electricity. The thermal emitter's radiation includes far more infrared wavelengths than occur in the solar spectrum, and "low band-gap" PV materials invented less than a decade ago can absorb more of that infrared radiation than standard silicon PVs can. But much of the heat is still wasted, so efficiencies remain relatively low.

An ideal match

The solution, Celanovic says, is to design a thermal emitter that radiates only the wavelengths that the PV diode can absorb and convert into electricity, while suppressing other wavelengths. "But how do we find a material that has this magical property of emitting only at the wavelengths that we want?" asks Marin Solja?i?, professor of physics and ISN researcher. The answer: Make a photonic crystal by taking a sample of material and create some nanoscale features on its surface -- say, a regularly repeating pattern of holes or ridges -- so light propagates through the sample in a dramatically different way.

"By choosing how we design the nanostructure, we can create materials that have novel optical properties," Solja?i? says. "This gives us the ability to control and manipulate the behavior of light."

The team -- which also includes Peter Bermel, research scientist in the Research Laboratory for Electronics (RLE); Peter Fisher, professor of physics; and Michael Ghebrebrhan, a postdoc in RLE -- used a slab of tungsten, engineering billions of tiny pits on its surface. When the slab heats up, it generates bright light with an altered emission spectrum because each pit acts as a resonator, capable of giving off radiation at only certain wavelengths.

This powerful approach -- co-developed by John D. Joannopoulos, the Francis Wright Davis Professor of Physics and ISN director, and others -- has been widely used to improve lasers, light-emitting diodes and even optical fibers. The MIT team, supported in part by a seed grant from the MIT Energy Initiative, is now working with collaborators at MIT and elsewhere to use it to create several novel electricity-generating devices.

Mike Waits, an electronics engineer at the Army Research Laboratory in Adelphi, Md., who was not involved in this work, says this approach to producing miniature power supplies could lead to lighter portable electronics, which is "critical for the soldier to lighten his load. It not only reduces his burden, but also reduces the logistics chain" to deliver those devices to the field. "There are a lot of lives at stake," he says, "so if you can make the power sources more efficient, it could be a great benefit."

The button-like device that uses hydrocarbon fuels such as butane or propane as its heat source -- known as a micro-TPV power generator -- has at its heart a "micro-reactor" designed by Klavs Jensen, the Warren K. Lewis Professor of Chemical Engineering, and fabricated in the Microsystems Technology Laboratories. While the device achieves a fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiency three times greater than that of a lithium-ion battery of the same size and weight, Celanovic is confident that with further work his team can triple the current energy density. "At that point, our TPV generator could power your smartphone for a whole week without being recharged," he says.

Celanovic and Solja?i? stress that building practical systems requires integrating many technologies and fields of expertise. "It's a really multidisciplinary effort," Celanovic says. "And it's a neat example of how fundamental research in materials can result in new performance that enables a whole spectrum of applications for efficient energy conversion."

Source: Science Daily (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110730180245.htm)

nondual
09-20-2011, 06:42 PM
Nevada's First Windfarm May Be the Nation's Largest (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/nevadas-first-windfarm-may-be-the-nations-largest.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/windturbine.jpg

A gigantic wind farm with the power output of three or four average-sized coal plants has been been proposed by the US wind development subsidiary of the European renewable energy investor Good Energies, in Nevada, according to ReCharge.

The wind farm would be extraordinary, the largest wind farm in the US at a staggering 990 MW. But it would also be Nevada's first ever wind farm. Wind power in the US now totals 42,432 MW of capacity. Texas is number two in the world. Iowa gets 20 percent of its energy from wind.

But unlike every state on its borders, all of which have at least 128 MW of turbines churning out wind energy, Nevada till now has had no wind farms at all. The hold-up has been the difficulties in getting a permit.

The Good Energies subsidiary Wilson Creek Power Partners' application to the PUCN (Public Utilities Commission of Nevada) is for a gigantic 990 MW project comprising up to 350 turbines, buried power collection lines, communication cables, access roads, meteorological towers, one or more substations and switchyards, an operation and maintenance building and an overhead transmission line.

The application cites the "above average wind speeds" at the sparsely populated region under consideration, Mt. Wilson, Table Mountain, White Rock Mountain and Atlanta Summit. The land is used mainly for cattle grazing, and would still be, if the wind farm was permitted there by the PUCN.

Good Energies says it aims to invest up to $1.5bn of development capital in North American renewable energy projects and companies. For Nevada, this would be a huge change.

Reuters (http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/09/19/idUS43966416220110919)

nondual
09-29-2011, 03:07 PM
World's Largest Solar Park (166MW) Built on Former Mine (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/worlds-largest-solar-park-166mw-built-on-former-mine.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/germany-worlds-largest-solar-park.png

There was a time when the title of the world's largest solar park was being measured in tens of MW. But that is rapidly changing. There are plans currently in the pipeline for plants as big as 400MW, and officials in Germany have just connected a new 78-megawatt portion of an existing plant that make it, they say, the current world leader in capacity.

78MW of Solar Built in 3 Months

Earlier this year, I posted about a 5MW solar farm in the UK that was built in just 6 weeks, arguing that it was a powerful demonstration of the rapid speed at which solar can be deployed. This point is illustrated even more powerfully by the fact that Renewable Energy World tells us the 78MW section of the Senftenburg plant in Eastern Germany was built in just 3 months. Of course equipment manufacture, planning and other set-up times should still be factored in, but compare those construction times to any other major energy source and I suspect they'll be pretty favorable.

Former Mine Becomes Clean Energy Beacon

The other notable aspect of the Senftenburg plant is that it was built on former open-pit mining land, meaning it is taking degraded, relatively unproductive land and turning it into a major source of energy production. Much like this old tin mine turned 1.4MW solar plant, there's more than a little symbolic value here as the old, extractive economy shows signs of giving way to a more nurturing, harmonious and sustainable one. (The developers also set aside a large portion of land for conservation purposes.)

Innovative Land Use for Better Solar

As large-scale solar plants become more common, developers will need to find ways to balance conservation and land-use issues with generating capacity. From reclaiming degraded land, to solar double cropping with farm land, through planting up solar and wind parks with bee-friendly wildflowers, to solar canopies on parking lots, there are plenty of ways to make that happen.

TreeHugger (http://www.treehugger.com/files/2011/09/worlds-largest-solar-plant-old-mine.php?campaign=th_rss_science)

nondual
10-07-2011, 06:03 AM
Work starts on world's largest solar bridge at Blackfriars (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/work-starts-on-worlds-largest-solar-bridge-at-blackfriars.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/blackfriarssolar.jpg

Blackfriars Bridge, a Victorian rail bridge in the heart of London, is now well on its way to becoming the biggest solar array in the city and the world's largest solar bridge. When the installation is complete, the roof of the new Blackfriars railway station will be home to over 6,000 square meters (64,583 sq.ft.) of solar panels, satisfying half of the station's power needs.

We recently featured a two mile stretch of rail tunnel with 16,000 solar panels on the roof, providing power to signaling, lighting, and heating of railway stations, and also to some of the trains using the Belgian rail network.

Now, Blackfriars Bridge has started to have over 4,400 high-efficiency HIT photovoltaic panels installed on its newly-built roof by London-based Solarcentury and engineers from Jacobs. Blackfriars spans the River Thames, and was originally built during the age of steam in 1886.

The new Blackfriars Station is currently being redeveloped as part of a Network Rail Thameslink program upgrade (with funding from the Department for Transport's safety and environment fund), which aims to have longer trains - meaning more seats for commuters - running from Bedford to Brighton via London. The solar installation will generate a claimed 900,000kWh of electricity every year, and will be joined by other energy-saving measures such as rain harvesting systems and sun pipes for natural lighting.

Gizmag (http://www.gizmag.com/blackfriars-solar-railway-bridge/20057/)

Only Teabaggers would say no... :crazzy:

nondual
10-27-2011, 10:38 AM
India Will Install 3,000 MW Wind Power This Year, Up 39% From 2010 (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/india-will-install-3000-mw-wind-power-this-year-up-39-from-2010.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/20111024-wind-turbine-installation-india.jpg

India's making some good progress in wind power: According the HSBC Global Research (via Business Standard), India is on track to install 2,984 MW of new wind power in 2011 -- an increase of 39% over last year's installations.

Currently, based on figures from the end of August, India has just about 15,000 MW of wind power installed.

According to the World Wind Energy Association, based on data going to June 2011, India was in the number-five position for installed wind power capacity. China led the world (52.8 GW), with the US in second place (42.3 GW), Germany in third (27.9 GW), and Spain in fourth (21.2 GW).

HSBC Global Research forecasts that strong, if a bit slower, growth will continue in India's wind power market in the coming years -- 2400 MW in 2012, increasing to 2700 MW in 2015.

As for the reason for this growth, the report notes, "the key drivers for growth are primarily a strong policy framework and improving cost competitiveness of wind technology compared to conventional generation."

TreeHugger (http://www.treehugger.com/files/2011/10/india-will-add-3000-mw-wind-power-2011.php?campaign=th_rss_science)

nondual
10-27-2011, 10:43 AM
WWF: 90% of UK’s Energy Could Come From Renewable Sources By 2030 (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/wwf-90-of-uks-energy-could-come-from-renewable-sources-by-2030.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/parliament-e1319567536297.jpg

A new report from the WWF indicates that by 2030 as much as 90% of the UK’s electricity could be produced by wind, solar, tidal and other sustainable sources. Energy prices are currently a major political issue in the UK with the 2020 targets meaning household bills would increase by 4%. However the WWF argues that prices could be reduced through better energy efficiency.

There are times when I really get frustrated with my home country. One moment, it appears we are exceeding our 2020 renewable energy targets, the next our love for gadgets is jeopardizing them. However the WWF’s latest report seems to indicate that the UK is resting on its laurels and that there is massive potential for the country’s energy supplies.

According to the report, between 60% and 90% of the nation’s electricity can be gathered from wind, solar, tidal and other sustainable sources. This figure would further be subsidized with the help of an international supergrid and gas power stations.

The WWF’s Positive Energy report not only trumpets greater energy efficiency, but unlike other reports it includes a continuation of renewable energy building after 2020. The energy scenarios at the core of the report were developed by GL Garrad Hassan, the world’s largest renewable energy consultancy and part of the GL Group. It states that in the highest renewables scenarios (90% of capacity), ambitious action on energy efficiency would reduce the capital costs of renewables, gas and supergrid interconnectors from £216bn to £170bn.

This unsurprisingly trumps the 45% target predicted by the government’s official advisers, but WWF points out that the build rates in its scenarios are actually lower than the government’s own forecasts in its national renewable energy action plan and significantly below industry projections on realistic build rates. The difference is that in WWF’s scenarios, rather than build rates falling rapidly after 2020, growth is maintained thanks to gas power.

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/europe-wind-farm.jpg

“Developing a low-carbon and sustainable power sector in the UK is first and foremost a question of political will,” states the report. Not only would it create hundreds of thousands of jobs and new economic growth, but “investing in clean energy offers us a means to tackle the two most crucial market failures that now confront the world: the financial crisis and climate change.”

UK Prime Minister David Cameron has pledged to lead the greenest UK government ever, but considering there are plans to construct more nuclear power stations, this title is in doubt.

“This report is inspiring, but also entirely realistic. It shows that a clean, renewable energy future really is within our grasp,” said David Nussbaum, chief executive of WWF-UK speaking to The Guardian. “Failure to commit to a high-renewables future would leave us facing the prospect of dangerous levels of climate change and high energy prices.”

Inhabitat (http://inhabitat.com/wwf-90-of-uks-energy-could-come-from-renewable-sources-by-2030/)

nondual
10-29-2011, 04:24 PM
500 MW Solar Power Plant Will Be Southwest Africa's Largest (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/500-mw-solar-power-plant-will-be-southwest-africas-largest.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/20111026-namibia-sun.jpg

A massive new solar power plant is in the works for Namibia, Renewable Energy World reports. The proposed project, to be built near the capital Windhoek by SSI Energy Solutions, currently has a power purchase agreement with the Namibian government for 500 MW worth of electricity -- with a potential expansion, adding on wind power, of another 500 MW.

The solar power part is expected to costs in the $1.6-2 billion range. Construction is expected to begin in January, and to be completed by 2013.

IEA stats (the latest from 2008) show Namibia's domestic electricity production coming 68% from hydropower and 32% from coal -- the latter imported from neighboring South Africa. Domestic generation from those sources was 2097 GWh, with an additional 2147 GWh of electricity imported.

Some quick calculations on the output from this proposed 500 MW power plant would go a long way towards meeting that demand from renewable sources.

TreeHugger (http://www.treehugger.com/files/2011/10/500-mw-solar-power-plant-will-be-southwest-africas-largest.php?campaign=th_rss_science)

nondual
11-05-2011, 10:14 AM
Morocco to host first solar farm in €400bn renewables network (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/morocco-to-host-first-solar-farm-in-400bn-renewables-network.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/parobolic-mirrors-at-a-so-007.jpg

Morocco has been chosen as the first location for a German-led, €400bn project to build a vast network of solar and windfarms across North Africa and the Middle East to provide 15% of Europe's electricity supply by 2050.

The Desertec Industrial Initiative (DII), a coalition of companies including E.ON, Siemens, Munich Re and Deutsche Bank, announced at its annual conference being held in Cairo on Wednesday that "all systems are go in Morocco", with construction of the first phase of a 500MW solar farm scheduled to start next year. The precise location of the €2bn plant is yet to be finalised, but it is expected to be built near the desert city of Ouarzazate. It will use parabolic mirrors to generate heat for conventional steam turbines, as opposed to the photovoltaic cells used in the UK.

The 12 square kilometre Moroccan solar farm will, said Paul van Son, Dii's chief executive, be a "reference project" to prove to investors and policy makers in both Europe and the Middle East/North Africa (MENA) region that the Desertec vision is not a dream-like mirage, but one that can be a major source of renewable electricity in the decades ahead.

Van Son described Desertec as a "win-win" for both Europe and MENA, adding that the Arab spring had created both opportunities and "questions" for the ambitious project. Discussions are already underway with the Tunisian government about building a solar farm, he said, and Algeria is the next "obvious" country, due to its close proximity to western Europe's grid. Countries such as Libya, Egypt, Turkey, Syria and Saudi Arabia are predicted to start joining the network from 2020, as a network of high voltage direct current cables are built and extended across the wider region.

German companies and policymakers have dominated the Dii conference, reflecting the nation's recent decision to totally phase out nuclear power by 2022 in reaction, in part, to the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan in March. By comparison, not a single representative from the UK was at the conference.

Jochen Homann, the state secretary at Germany's Federal Ministry for Economics and Technology, told the conference: "We undertook major reforms in German energy policy this summer and Desertec opens up an opportunity for us. We want to enter the age of renewables with sustainable sources of electricity supplying 80% of our power generation by 2050. As we accelerate our phase-out of nuclear power, we need to safeguard an affordable supply of electricity and we will be interested in importing renewables supplies in the future. Germany's government will continue to support Desertec. It is an inspiring vision which is good for foreign, climate and economic policies."

But Homann stressed there would be "pre-conditions" for guaranteeing long-term support from the Germany government. He said there must be "liberalisation" of the energy markets across the MENA region: "North Africa still provides huge subsidies for fossil fuels. There will need to be regulatory improvements. Only then will renewables be able to compete and a common market created. And other European states must participate, too."

Hassan Younes, Egypt's minister of electricity and energy, told the conference that Egypt was keen to participate and that it hoped to have a 1,000MW windfarm built by 2016 in the Gulf of Suez, adding to the 150MW "hybrid" gas-solar power plant that opened 100km south of Cairo earlier this year.

The conference was told via a Dii promotional video that the network of solar and windfarms across the MENA region would help to "halt migration" into Europe, by fast-tracking the rise of the region's youthful population out of poverty and unemployment.

The Desertec plan was welcomed by many in Germany, including chancellor Angela Merkel. However, some German critics argued that the concept of transmitting solar power from Africa to Europe was not proven and that a billion dollar project does not fit in to the country's green energy plan.

German development NGO Germanwatch raised concerns that local people should benefit from the scheme, though Desertec representatives said the energy generated will first be used by the people of north Africa before being exported. Andree Böhling, energy expert at Greenpeace Germany, said: "We have to avoid European companies getting their hands on local resources, therefore we will follow the project carefully."

• This article was amended on 3 November to remove an incorrect reference to Germanwatch and neocolonialism

Guardian (http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2011/nov/02/morocco-solar-farm-renewables)

nondual
11-17-2011, 11:59 AM
A limitless power source for the indefinite future (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/a-limitless-power-source-for-the-indefinite-future.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/space_solar_power.png

On Monday, the National Space Society (NSS) will present findings from an eye-opening new report by the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA). You’re hearing about this here first. (Full disclosure: I’m a member of the NSS board of directors.)

Some background: By 2030–40, the projected annual electrical energy consumption will be a staggering 220 trillion kiloWatt hours, double the consumption in 2010 — and four times more by 2090–2100, according to the International Energy Agency and U.S. Department of Energy.

“Economic concerns have diverted attention from energy policy and limited the means of intervention,” the International Energy Agency reports in its 2011 World Energy Outlook. “Post-Fukushima, nuclear is facing uncertainty. MENA [Middle East and North Africa] turmoil raised questions about the region’s investment plans. Some key trends are pointing in worrying directions: CO2 emissions rebounded to a record high, energy efficiency of the global economy worsened for the 2nd straight year, and spending on oil imports is near record highs.”


The space solar power solution

In 2002, Dr. Martin Hoffert, Professor Emeritus of Physics, New York University, proposed a radical solution to what appears to be a serious coming energy shortfall (Science, 2002): space solar power (SSP) — collect energy from space and transmit it wirelessly anywhere in the world.

The basic concept, invented in the late 60s by Dr. Peter Glaser of Arthur D. Little: a large platform, positioned in space in a high Earth orbit continuously collects and converts solar energy into electricity. This power is then used to drive a wireless power transmission system that transmits the solar energy to receivers on Earth. Because of its immunity to nighttime, to weather or to the changing seasons, the SPS concept. has the potential to achieve much greater energy efficiency than ground based solar power systems.

There are significant advantages to SSP compared to ground solar power, according to an NSS statement: solar energy in space is seven times greater per unit area than on the ground, and the collection of solar space energy is not disrupted by nightfall and inclement weather, avoiding the need for expensive energy storage. And it’s especially valuable for isolated areas of the world (parts of Africa and India, for example.)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/global-energy-demand.png


SSP technically feasible in 10–20 years

However, so far, the SSP concept has lacked the needed in-depth technology, market, and economic assessment. (I’ve personally been skeptical.) But on Monday Nov. 14 at a press conference (open to the public) at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., the National Space Society will announce the findings of an impressive three-year, ten-nation study of space solar power by the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA), co-chaired by John Mankins, a 25-year NASA veteran who headed NASA’s study of space solar power in the 90s, and Prof. Nobuyuki Kaya, Vice Dean of the Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University.


Its findings include:


*Space solar power appears to be technically feasible within 10–20 years using technologies existing now in the laboratory;

*It appears to be economically viable in the next 1–3 decades under several different scenarios for future energy markets, including potential government actions to mediate environment/climate change issues;

*Low-cost Earth-to-orbit transportation systems appear to be technically feasible during the coming 20–30 years using technologies existing in the laboratory now;

*Flight experiments are needed, and policy-related and regulatory issues must be resolved.


Occupy space

“The report gets across one very basic message: in the eyes of the leading experts on aerospace technology worldwide: harvesting solar power in space and transmitting it to earth is no longer science fiction,” says author Howard Bloom in a companion announcement by the Space Development Steering Committee. “It is sound, current-technology-based science fact. And it is a green energy option we can’t ignore."

“SSP produces no greenhouse gases. It offers a way out of the trap of climate change. It is supremely sustainable. It can make us a net energy exporter, a position the United States enjoyed until 1951. And, as a National Space Security Office report on space solar power points out, SSP is an energy source that can end our hemorrhage of cash to hostile oil nations and can save us from the trillion dollar budgets of energy wars. No wonder a recent report from the Council on Foreign Relations and the Aspen Institute concluded that ‘A successful effort,’ in space solar power ‘could provide unprecedented levels of clean and renewable energy.’”

“Without any doubt the components technology for space solar power as well as various system concepts have been developed and tested successfully,” says Dr. Neville I. Marzwell, NASA-JPL Advanced Concepts and Technology Innovation Manager (recently retired). “The next logical steps are the validation of power transmission from space to ground, and power storage at a continuously increasing level to validate the economical analysis and create financial, technical, social, environmental, and political support across the globe. The industrial countries of the world cannot and should not miss this opportunity to meet their energy demand safely while creating financial and job growth.”

“We run on energy like Rome ran on slavery,” says Hoffert.”But we’ve hit an economic, energy and environmental wall. Space-based solar power is a technologically ready path over the wall to sustainable high tech civilization on Earth; an ideologically cross-cutting approach encompassing the military-industrial complex and Occupy Wall Street."

“It can create real jobs, both near- and long-term in orbital light and power industries of the 21st century much as the NASA’s Apollo Program industrialized the South to produce high tech cars and aircraft today. And of course space-based solar power offers a unique challenge to the U.S. in the spirit of Steve Jobs and Silicon Valley: ‘Don’t tell us the sky’s the limit when our footprints are on the Moon.’”

Kurzweil AI (http://www.kurzweilai.net/a-limitless-power-source-for-the-indefinite-future)

nondual
11-18-2011, 09:33 AM
The Future of Free Energy is here now! The end of oil, coal and nuclear pollution!

ghhgUmGBjX8

The future of free energy is at hand. The end of the energy barons, war mongers and central bankers will follow. So, let's all demand this technology be implemented immediately.

Imagine the technology shown here interfaces with Corning's new Display Glass Technology. This is the future for all of us. Free Energy and Free Thinking, the free interchange of all vital information via a free energy system.

nondual
12-03-2011, 12:58 PM
Wind power to make up half of Danish energy use in 2020 (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/wind-power-to-make-up-half-of-danish-energy-use-in-2020.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/denmarkaimst.jpg

Denmark aims to have wind power supply half of the country's electricity needs in 2020, under a new programme presented by Climate and Energy Minister Martin Lidegaard on Friday.

"Denmark must use a lot more renewable energy and we will have to become much better at using energy efficiently," Lidegaard told reporters.

The country aims to be 100 percent free of fossil fuels in 2050, relying instead on wind power, biomass and biogas, the government said on its website where it presented its new "Our Energy" programme.

The left-wing government, which came to power in September, has largely overtaken the previous centre-right administration's energy programme "but setting the goals higher", the ministry said.

The previous government's plan called for an increase in the use of wind power from 20 percent today to 42 percent in 2020.

The new government plans to invest 5.6 billion kronor (750 millio n euros, $996 million) in its energy programme, compared to 3.6 billion earmarked by its predecessor.

The investments will be financed by the public and companies through higher energy prices, encouraging Danes to better isolate their homes and buildings to save energy.

The government expects households to reduce their average energy consumption by eight to 10 percent by 2020.

The government said it planned to hold negotiations with political parties across the board so that the programme will not have to be changed when a different government comes to power.

PhysOrg (http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-11-power-danish-energy.html)

Bruce LeeRoy
12-03-2011, 07:47 PM
The Future of Free Energy is here now! The end of oil, coal and nuclear pollution!

ghhgUmGBjX8

The future of free energy is at hand. The end of the energy barons, war mongers and central bankers will follow. So, let's all demand this technology be implemented immediately.

Imagine the technology shown here interfaces with Corning's new Display Glass Technology. This is the future for all of us. Free Energy and Free Thinking, the free interchange of all vital information via a free energy system.

Interesting video, thanks for sharing...:thumbsup:

A HUGE part of that video was saying "forget about the infrastructure" that is huge, once we can get people to get past that precept, this is not only possible but very likely. I, personally am almost off the grid, with wind power, and I had high hopes for the Solyndra technology too, would have dropped the price of solar dramatically.

I wish you would stop all the Tea Bagger bullshit though, but whatever. :confused:

nondual
12-04-2011, 07:31 AM
Interesting video, thanks for sharing...:thumbsup:

A HUGE part of that video was saying "forget about the infrastructure" that is huge, once we can get people to get past that precept, this is not only possible but very likely. I, personally am almost off the grid, with wind power, and I had high hopes for the Solyndra technology too, would have dropped the price of solar dramatically.

I wish you would stop all the Tea Bagger bullshit though, but whatever. :confused:
In my view, the original Boston Tea Party and today's so-called 'Tea Party' are the opposite of each other. :dunno:

http://i1230.photobucket.com/albums/ee485/cyberdyno2/318315_265528006822325_100000953839737_723193_1945 880701_n.jpg

nondual
12-06-2011, 01:45 PM
Sun-Tracking Solar Trees Installed at GM Tech Facility (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/sun-tracking-solar-trees-installed-at-gm-tech-facility.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/solar-tree-gm.jpg.492x0_q85_crop-smart.jpg

w-RP8iBlnIs

Envision released the following announcement in the wake of the ribbon-cutting ceremony last week: "The deployment includes Solar Tree structures which incorporate Envision's CleanChargeT CIT, "column-integrated" electric vehicle charging stations. The Solar Tree structures also incorporate Envision's EnvisionTrakT multi-axis solar tracking technology which should increase the efficiency of the installation by as much as 25%."

You can see the innovative tracking mechanism at work in the video above. The trees will also provide shade for non-EV cars, and have the benefit of making the GM Tech Facility look appropriately futuristic.

And so, it appears that when the Times asked 'Will Solar Trees be Sprouting in Parking Lots?' a while back, the answer is a definitive 'Yep'.

TreeHugger (http://www.treehugger.com/renewable-energy/sun-tracking-solar-trees-installed-gm-tech-facility.html)

Bruce LeeRoy
12-06-2011, 07:43 PM
In my view, the original Boston Tea Party and today's so-called 'Tea Party' are the opposite of each other. :dunno:

http://i1230.photobucket.com/albums/ee485/cyberdyno2/318315_265528006822325_100000953839737_723193_1945 880701_n.jpg

http://brainshavings.com/images/Occupy-Wall-Street-vs-The-Tea-Party.jpg

Or

http://moonbattery.com/tea-party_vs_occupy-wall-street_1.jpg

nondual
12-07-2011, 08:59 AM
http://moonbattery.com/tea-party_vs_occupy-wall-street_1.jpg



What Conservatives Believe In: You’re-On-Your-Own Economics
“Their philosophy is simple: we are better off when everyone is left to fend for themselves and play by their own rules.”
[...]

“Now, just as there was in Teddy Roosevelt’s time, there’s been a certain crowd in Washington for the last few decades who respond to this economic challenge with the same old tune. “The market will take care of everything,” they tell us. If only we cut more regulations and cut more taxes – especially for the wealthy – our economy will grow stronger. Sure, there will be winners and losers. But if the winners do really well, jobs and prosperity will eventually trickle down to everyone else. And even if prosperity doesn’t trickle down, they argue, that’s the price of liberty.”

“It’s a simple theory – one that speaks to our rugged individualism and healthy skepticism of too much government. It fits well on a bumper sticker. Here’s the problem: It doesn’t work. It’s never worked. It didn’t work when it was tried in the decade before the Great Depression. It’s not what led to the incredible post-war boom of the 50s and 60s. And it didn’t work when we tried it during the last decade.”


What Progressives Believe In: An Economy That Works For Everyone
“We are greater together than we are on our own. I believe that this country succeeds when everyone gets a fair shot, when everyone does their fair share, and when everyone plays by the same rules. Those aren’t Democratic or Republican values; 1% values or 99% values. They’re American values, and we have to reclaim them.”
[...]

“Our success has never just been about survival of the fittest. It’s been about building a nation where we’re all better off. We pull together, we pitch in, and we do our part, believing that hard work will pay off; that responsibility will be rewarded; and that our children will inherit a nation where those values live on.”


FACTS: America Isn’t Supposed to Work for the Top 1 Percent Alone

The top 1 percent of Americans own 40 percent of our country’s wealth (http://www.vanityfair.com/society/features/2011/05/top-one-percent-201105) while the bottom 80 percent owns only 7 percent.
The richest 1 percent earned $1 out of every $4 (http://elsa.berkeley.edu/~saez/saez-UStopincomes-2007.pdf) in 2007. Thirty years earlier the richest only made one out of every $11.
The top 1 percent is taking in more of the nation’s income (http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2908) than at any time since the 1920s.
The average income in the top .01 percent (http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/president-obamas-economic-speech-in-osawatomie-kans/2011/12/06/gIQAVhe6ZO_print.html) is now $27 MILLION.
A typical CEO used to earn 30 times more than his or her workers now earns 110 times more (http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/president-obamas-economic-speech-in-osawatomie-kans/2011/12/06/gIQAVhe6ZO_print.html).
Millionaires are making more money and paying fewer taxes – their taxes declined (http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2011/08/millionaire_tax_rates.html) from about 31 percent in 1995 to about 22 percent in 2009.
One in four millionaires pays a lower tax rate (http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/report-one-in-four-millionaires-pays-less-in-taxes-than-the-middle-class/2011/10/12/gIQAh8XNfL_story.html) than 10 MILLION middle-class Americans.
Tax rates for the richest 400 Americans were sliced in half as their income quadrupled (http://thinkprogress.org/politics/2011/04/18/159261/tax-disparity-chart/). Now they’re paying just 16.6 percent.
Nearly 1,500 millionaires paid NO income taxes in 2009 (http://content.usatoday.com/communities/ondeadline/post/2011/08/irs-1470-millionaires-paid-no-income-tax-in-09/1).FACTS: When the Economy Isn’t Working for Everyone, It’s Not Working

Fourteen million (http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2011/10/more_job_creation.html) Americans are unemployed.
Nearly one in two young adults are not employed (http://couriernews.suntimes.com/8083045-417/young-adults-trying-to-find-way-in-recessionary-world.html). This is the lowest rate since the end of World War II.
Corporations are sitting on $2 trillion in cash (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111903927204576574720017009568.html)— more cash than at any time in nearly a half century—instead of hiring more employees.
While the richest 1 percent saw their incomes triple (http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/1a8a5cb2-9ab2-11df-87e6-00144feab49a.html#axzz1aax4e7vs) between 1974 and 2007, most Americans’ incomes didn’t grow at all (http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2011/09/unionsmiddleclass.html).
The bottom 90 percent are responsible for paying 73 percent (http://sociology.ucsc.edu/whorulesamerica/power/wealth.html) of all credit card and mortgage debt.
One in four homeowners (http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-05-09/u-s-underwater-homeowners-increase-to-28-percent-zillow-says.html) are underwater, meaning they owe more on their mortgage than their house is worth.
College tuition and fees increased 274.7 percent (http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2011/02/disrupting_college.html) from 1990 to 2009. That’s faster than any other goods or services besides cigarettes.
Almost one in four American children (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/22/children-in-poverty-us_n_976868.html) are growing up in poverty.
In Short
“This isn’t about class warfare. This is about the nation’s welfare. It’s about making choices that benefit not just the people who’ve done fantastically well over the last few decades, but that benefits the middle class, and those fighting to get to the middle class, and the economy as a whole.”
And Finally…
From Teddy Roosevelt’s 1910 New Nationalism speech:

“If that remark was original with me, I should be even more strongly denounced as a Communist agitator than I shall be anyhow. It is Lincoln’s. I am only quoting it; and that is one side; that is the side the capitalist should hear. Now, let the working man hear his side.”

From President Obama’s speech today, a passage which elicited knowing laughter from the audience:

“For this, Roosevelt was called a radical, a socialist, even a communist. But today, we are a richer nation and a stronger democracy because of what he fought for in his last campaign: an eight hour work day and a minimum wage for women; insurance for the unemployed, the elderly, and those with disabilities; political reform and a progressive income tax.”

nondual
12-07-2011, 09:04 AM
“I hold that while man exists it is his duty to improve not only his own condition, but to assist in ameliorating mankind.”

“The absence of effective State, and, especially, national, restraint upon unfair money-getting has tended to create a small class of enormously wealthy and economically powerful men, whose chief object is to hold and increase their power. The prime need to is to change the conditions which enable these men to accumulate power which it is not for the general welfare that they should hold or exercise. We grudge no man a fortune which represents his own power and sagacity, when exercised with entire regard to the welfare of his fellows.” - The words of two Republican presidents, Abraham Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt, respectively.

Bruce LeeRoy
12-07-2011, 01:51 PM
“We are greater together than we are on our own. I believe that this country succeeds when everyone gets a fair shot, when everyone does their fair share, and when everyone plays by the same rules. Those aren’t Democratic or Republican values; 1% values or 99% values. They’re American values, and we have to reclaim them.”

I agree with this statement, but the lead into it is completely, well leading “We are greater together than we are on our own" - The greatest of a Nation is in the health of the individual not in the health of the state. That statement says as much from what you posted. You can have a "healthy" state and not a healthy individual, but you can't have a healthy individual and not a healthy state. The healthy individual makes up the state, not the state makes up the individual.

"when everyone gets a fair shot" The problem isnt that Free markets or capitalism doesnt work, its that both have been subverted towards the 1%, with illegal monopolies, monetary policy and theft. This is in no way capitalism or free markets.

you can post all the frilly articles you want to support your socialist views but most of it just propaganda.

I am pretty sure we are on the same page, I just dont agree with a socialist view to achieve these goals. You see what is happening today, this is because of to much power focused at the top, and you want more of it?

We need, (I think) to get back to the rule of law, and let the markets work as they are supposed to, it did work like this, and very well, unfortunately those that profited bought the politician, that needs to stop. We agree with that??

Bruce LeeRoy
12-07-2011, 01:52 PM
“I hold that while man exists it is his duty to improve not only his own condition, but to assist in ameliorating mankind.”

“The absence of effective State, and, especially, national, restraint upon unfair money-getting has tended to create a small class of enormously wealthy and economically powerful men, whose chief object is to hold and increase their power. The prime need to is to change the conditions which enable these men to accumulate power which it is not for the general welfare that they should hold or exercise. We grudge no man a fortune which represents his own power and sagacity, when exercised with entire regard to the welfare of his fellows.” - The words of two Republican presidents, Abraham Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt, respectively.

Ok, but they are not advocating socialism?

nondual
12-07-2011, 02:14 PM
I agree with this statement, but the lead into it is completely, well leading “We are greater together than we are on our own" - The greatest of a Nation is in the health of the individual not in the health of the state. That statement says as much from what you posted. You can have a "healthy" state and not a healthy individual, but you can't have a healthy individual and not a healthy state. The healthy individual makes up the state, not the state makes up the individual.

"when everyone gets a fair shot" The problem isnt that Free markets or capitalism doesnt work, its that both have been subverted towards the 1%, with illegal monopolies, monetary policy and theft. This is in no way capitalism or free markets.

you can post all the frilly articles you want to support your socialist views but most of it just propaganda.

I am pretty sure we are on the same page, I just dont agree with a socialist view to achieve these goals. You see what is happening today, this is because of to much power focused at the top, and you want more of it?

We need, (I think) to get back to the rule of law, and let the markets work as they are supposed to, it did work like this, and very well, unfortunately those that profited bought the politician, that needs to stop. We agree with that??
Capitalism only works when there is a set of rules to be followed, and that's where regulation and oversight come in.

nondual
12-07-2011, 02:17 PM
Ok, but they are not advocating socialism?
Our social security system is socialist, so is Medicare, public education, and food stamps. Those programs are what made America an exceptional country, and the people love it and will always support it. That's why Ron Paul is going nowhere. :dunno:

But enough politics, this is the technology board. :)

Bruce LeeRoy
12-07-2011, 03:03 PM
Our social security system is socialist, so is Medicare, public education, and food stamps. Those programs are what made America an exceptional country, and the people love it and will always support it. That's why Ron Paul is going nowhere. :dunno:

But enough politics, this is the technology board. :)

Holy shit, you name off the programs that are failing the worst as a vindication of socialism. LOL

Ok, Technology, My house is almost 100% wind powered, what are YOU doing with this "technology" :D

nondual
12-07-2011, 06:33 PM
Holy shit, you name off the programs that are failing the worst as a vindication of socialism. LOL

Ok, Technology, My house is almost 100% wind powered, what are YOU doing with this "technology" :D
Failing the worst? That would be public education, but that's because of continuous defunding. We need to invest 10 times more on education. Look at China.

Bruce LeeRoy
12-07-2011, 06:39 PM
Failing the worst? That would be public education, but that's because of continuous defunding. We need to invest 10 times more on education. Look at China.

These programs start with good intentions, I am not saying anything other then that, but sending money to DC to be watched over by criminals is insanity, period.

The funds for Medicare/aide have been ripped off and are now gone. these programs are going to run out of money, its a poorly conceived idea to think DC can manage such a system.

If you were to take the same money and put it into any other "IRA" or similar savings it would pay better dividends then these programs would and that just simple math.

This is my point!

Let me ask you this, what gives you the assumption that sending money to DC is going to go for anything that its supposed to go for? This is a big pile of cash, you dont think these crooks are going to get their hands on it?

Answer that.

nondual
12-07-2011, 08:05 PM
These programs start with good intentions, I am not saying anything other then that, but sending money to DC to be watched over by criminals is insanity, period.

The funds for Medicare/aide have been ripped off and are now gone. these programs are going to run out of money, its a poorly conceived idea to think DC can manage such a system.

If you were to take the same money and put it into any other "IRA" or similar savings it would pay better dividends then these programs would and that just simple math.

This is my point!

Let me ask you this, what gives you the assumption that sending money to DC is going to go for anything that its supposed to go for? This is a big pile of cash, you dont think these crooks are going to get their hands on it?

Answer that.
It used to work until banks and corps took ownership of the US Congress. Take the money out and we have half the fight won.

Bruce LeeRoy
12-07-2011, 08:27 PM
It used to work until banks and corps took ownership of the US Congress. Take the money out and we have half the fight won.

I agree, but I am saying its just simply a bad business model to begin with, I'm not sure its worth saving in its current form.

I did'nt mean to hijack your thread, we agree overall, just the method to attain it we dont agree with.

Continue with your thread ND, my bad. :thumbsup:

crowonapost
12-08-2011, 02:55 AM
A profound lie on individual and collective freedom.

He misses a fundamental point, that individual & groups of folks, regardless of race or ideology are interconnected, it's again bottom up. Something you still truly fail to grasp.

Sorry.

nondual
12-09-2011, 06:27 AM
Solar Power Much Cheaper to Produce Than Most Analysts Realize, Study Finds (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/solar-power-much-cheaper-to-produce-than-most-analysts-realize-study-finds.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/solar.jpg

The public is being kept in the dark about the viability of solar photovoltaic energy, according to a study conducted at Queen's University.

"Many analysts project a higher cost for solar photovoltaic energy because they don't consider recent technological advancements and price reductions," says Joshua Pearce, Adjunct Professor, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering. "Older models for determining solar photovoltaic energy costs are too conservative."

Dr. Pearce believes solar photovoltaic systems are near the "tipping point" where they can produce energy for about the same price other traditional sources of energy.

Analysts look at many variables to determine the cost of solar photovoltaic systems for consumers, including installation and maintenance costs, finance charges, the system's life expectancy, and the amount of electricity it generates.

Dr. Pearce says some studies don't consider the 70 per cent reduction in the cost of solar panels since 2009 . Furthermore, he says research now shows the productivity of top-of-the-line solar panels only drops between 0.1 and 0.2 percent annually, which is much less than the one per cent used in many cost analyses.

Equipment costs are determined based on dollars per watt of electricity produced. One 2010 study estimated this cost at $7.61, while a 2003 study set the amount at $4.16. According to Dr. Pearce, the real cost in 2011 is under $1 per watt for solar panels purchased in bulk on the global market, though he says system and installation costs vary widely.

Dr. Pearce has created a calculator program available for download online that can be used to determine the true costs of solar energy.

The Queen's study was co-authored by grad students Kadra Branker and Michael Pathak and published in the December edition of Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews.

Science Daily (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/12/111207132916.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily+%28ScienceDaily% 3A+Latest+Science+News%29)

nondual
12-10-2011, 11:09 AM
New wave of ocean energy to be trialed off the coast of Australia (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/new-wave-of-ocean-energy-to-be-trialed-off-the-coast-of-australia.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/biowave.jpg

Anyone who has ever been scuba diving in a bull kelp forest will tell you - the stuff does not stand still. The marine aquatic plant consists of a long skinny-but-tough stem (or stipe) that is anchored to the sea floor and topped with a hollow float, from which a number of "leaves" (or blades) extend to the surface. The result is a seaweed that extends vertically up through the water column, continuously swaying back and forth with the surging waves. The researchers at Australia's BioPower Systems evidently looked at that kelp, and thought, "what if we could use that swaying action to generate power?" The result was their envisioned bioWAVE system, which could soon become a reality, thanks to a just-announced AUD$5 million (US$5.1 million) grant from the Victorian Minister for Energy and Resources.

At the base of each bioWAVE system would be a triangular foundation, keeping it anchored to the sea floor. Extending up from the middle of that foundation would be a central column, topped with multiple blades - these would actually be more like a combination of the kelp's blades and floats, as they would be cylindrical, buoyant structures that just reach to the surface. The column would join the foundation via a hinged pivot, allowing it to bend or swivel in any direction.

Wave action (both at the surface and below) would catch the blades and push them back and forth, in turn causing the column to move back and forth relative to the foundation. This movement would pressurize fluid within an integrated hydraulic power conversion module, known as an O-Drive. The movement of that fluid would spin a generator, converting the kinetic energy of the waves into electricity, which would then be delivered to shore via subsea cables. The video below illustrates how the system would work.

http://vimeo.com/17744727

According to BioPower, each system could be installed in the ocean using standard vessels without any special equipment - all components would be towed and then sunk into place. The O-Drive would be easily detached and replaced, so the whole assembly wouldn't need to be pulled out of the water for servicing. Additionally, the system would automatically detect unusually large swells, at which point it would flood the blades, causing them to lie down flat against the seabed for protection - this should allow for lighter, less expensive construction materials, as the blades wouldn't need to be designed to take the full force of violent conditions.

As an added bonus, unlike many other wave power systems, very little hardware would be visible above the surface. This should help with public acceptance of the technology.

The $5 million grant will go towards an AUD$14 million (US$14,365,000) four-year pilot demonstration unit, to be installed at a grid-connected site near Port Fairy, Victoria. Some other funds have already been obtained, leaving $3.6 million still to be raised.

While the 250-kilowatt pilot system would operate in 30-meter (98.5-foot)-deep waters, the planned 1-megawatt commercial-scale units would work at depths of 40-45 meters (131-148 feet), each one running four O-Drives in parallel. A number of such units could be located in one area where the depth and wave action are ideal, creating "wave farms."

We wish BioPower luck with the endeavor, and will be watching its progress with interest.

Gizmag (http://www.gizmag.com/biopower-biowave-kelp-wave-power/20733/)

nondual
12-17-2011, 09:39 AM
Wireless Car Charging Could Be Here As Soon as 2013 (http://www.zeitnews.org/transportation/wireless-car-charging-could-be-here-as-soon-as-2013-read-more-wireless-car-charging-could-be-here-as-soon-as-2013-inhabitat-green-design-will-save-the-world.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Transportation/rsz-evatran-hubcap-ev-inductive-charger-537x331.jpg

Wireless electric car charging, the technology many said was too inefficient or impractical to be a success, now appears to be a top priority for many automakers and electronics suppliers. We recently told you how Daimler was testing an inductive charging system for the next-generation Mercedes E-Cell vehicle, and we already know Nissan is working on a system for the 2014 LEAF as well as quick-charging systems that can power your house in reverse. Now we’ve discovered that Evatran is making hubcap-sized wireless charging systems for both the LEAF and the Chevy Volt that should be available through Sears next year. And there’s more.

The Rolls-Royce 102 EX Phantom is already being designed with a wireless charging system from HaloIPT, and rumor is that Infiniti’s luxury version of the LEAF will have a wireless inductive charging system available as an add-on next year. Delphi and WiTricity also have a system under development that could charge all the electronic devices in your home wirelessly, including your vehicle, and General Electric’s wall-mounted WattStation is already available on Amazon for just over $1,000. Evatran’s system is expected to cost a somewhat hefty $2,500 before installation, and the industry still needs to set standards on safety and essentially pick a winning technology before this technology hits the mainstream. But you may not have to wait very long to charge your vehicle simply by parking it. A wireless electric future appears to be just around the corner.

dvCkTGdZJx8

nondual
12-20-2011, 06:50 AM
German Village Produces 321% More Energy Than It Needs (http://www.realnews24.com/german-village-produces-321-more-energy-than-it-needs/)

http://www.realnews24.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Wildpoldsried-DE-300x210.jpg

It’s no surprise that the country that has kicked butt at the Solar Decathlon competition (to produce energy positive solar houses) year after year is the home to such a productive energy-efficient village. The village’s green initiative first started in 1997 when the village council decided that it should build new industries, keep initiatives local, bring in new revenue, and create no debt. Over the past 14 years, the community has equipped nine new community buildings with solar panels, built four biogas digesters (with a fifth in construction now) and installed seven windmills with two more on the way. In the village itself, 190 private households have solar panels while the district also benefits from three small hydro power plants, ecological flood control, and a natural waste water system.

All of these green systems means that despite only having a population of 2,600, Wildpoldsried produces 321 percent more energy than it needs – and it’s generating 4.0 million Euro (US $5.7 million) in annual revenue by selling it back to the national grid. It is no surprise to learn that small businesses have developed in the village specifically to provide services to the renewable energy installations.

More here (http://www.realnews24.com/german-village-produces-321-more-energy-than-it-needs/).

nondual
12-20-2011, 06:54 AM
SCIENTISTS DEVELOP AFFORDABLE SOLAR PANELS THAT WORK IN THE DARK (http://www.greenwala.com/community/blogs/all/13103-Scientists-Develop-Affordable-Solar-Panels-That-Work-In-The-Dark)

http://s3.amazonaws.com/greenwala-attachments/production/attachments/18055/group_large/solar_panels_at_night_lunar_panels.jpg

It's about damn time, don't you think?

Scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory announced Wednesday that they have been able to confirm a new high-efficiency solar cell design that utilizes nearly the entire solar spectrum.

Translation: They figured out a way to make solar panels generate electricity in the dark.

CleanTechnica says (http://cleantechnica.com/2011/01/26/finally-a-low-cost-solar-panel-that-can-see-in-the-dark/),


In earlier trials, the researchers used different alloys that achieved full spectrum responses but involved very high production costs. The advantage of gallium arsenide nitride is that it is very similar to a conventional semiconductor, gallium arsenide, and it can be produced with a commonly used fabrication method involving chemical vapor deposition.

The Lawrence Berkeley breakthrough represents just one path to increasing the efficiency and lowering the cost of solar cells. Over at Ohio State University, a full spectrum solar cell is also under development, and Stanford is pursuing a new technology that cuts around the problem of solar cell efficiency loss due to high temperature.

In the meantime, you could just turn any metal surface into solar panels with photovoltaic spray paint (http://www.greenwala.com/channels/green-business/blog/11174-Turn-Steel-Into-Solar-Panels-With-Photovoltaic-Spray-Paint).

nondual
12-20-2011, 07:21 AM
NREL Scientists Report First Solar Cell Producing More Electrons In Photocurrent Than Solar Photons Entering Cell (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy-and-fuels-research/nrel-scientists-report-first-solar-cell-producing-more-electrons-in-photocurrent-than-solar-photons-entering-cell.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/08682_nrel-photocurrent-114-3-537x392.jpg

Researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have reported the first solar cell that produces a photocurrent that has an external quantum efficiency greater than 100 percent when photoexcited with photons from the high energy region of the solar spectrum.

The external quantum efficiency for photocurrent, usually expressed as a percentage, is the number of electrons flowing per second in the external circuit of a solar cell divided by the number of photons per second of a specific energy (or wavelength) that enter the solar cell. None of the solar cells to date exhibit external photocurrent quantum efficiencies above 100 percent at any wavelength in the solar spectrum.

The external quantum efficiency reached a peak value of 114 percent. The newly reported work marks a promising step toward developing Next Generation Solar Cells for both solar electricity and solar fuels that will be competitive with, or perhaps less costly than, energy from fossil or nuclear fuels.

Source: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (http://www.nrel.gov/news/press/2011/1667.html)

nondual
01-07-2012, 08:52 AM
Düsseldorf Airport Installs One of The Largest Solar Arrays in Germany (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/duesseldorf-airport-installs-one-of-the-largest-solar-arrays-in-germany.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/dusseldorf-solar-array-1-537x392.jpg

The Düsseldorf International Airport is about to flip the switch on one of the largest solar arrays in Germany. The 8,400 panel, 2 megawatt solar array spans the space of six soccer fields, and it was finished in time to start feeding power to the grid before the clock strikes 2012. To prove the solar array’s everyday worth, the airport has installed a real time statistics ticker in the airport lobby so passengers can see how much energy it is creating and how much carbon dioxide is being diverted from the atmosphere.

Construction on the array was completed in just eight weeks — it was started this past October — and was built through a partnership between Düsseldorf International and a subsidiary of the city’s public services, Grünwerke GmbH. “A PV plant of this magnitude within the safety parameters of one of the country’s largest passenger airports reflects a new way of thinking about renewable energies, and we welcome it as another contribution of our city in the service of environment,” said Dirk Elbers, Düsseldorf’s mayor.

The solar array is the largest ground-mounted system located within the security zone of a German Airport but it isn’t the Düsseldorf Airport’s first foray into renewable energy. “Solar energy is not the only source of renewable energy at DUS. We also employ combined heat and power technology in a block heating station, and keep carbon dioxide emissions even lower this way,” noted Christoph Blume, CEO of DUS. The new solar array will create enough power to run 600 four person homes every year.

Inhabitat (http://inhabitat.com/dusseldorf-airport-installs-one-of-the-largest-solar-arrays-in-germany/)

nondual
01-13-2012, 08:06 AM
Onyx Unveils All-In-One 330 Watt Plug and Play Solar Panels (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/onyx-unveils-all-in-one-330-watt-plug-and-play-solar-panels.html)

Onyx just announced that they have installed their first 330-Watt “Plug-N-Play” solar panels at their demonstration site in Orlando, Florida. The two all-in-one solar panels have an incorporated micro inverter and a standard US AC power outlet plug that allows the owner to simply plug an extension cord into the panel and then use that chord like an outlet in their home. One of the demonstration panels also has a lithium battery incorporated into the unit that can store power for when the sun isn’t shining. The panels are designed to attract homeowners who are not interested in the expensive installation costs of most solar panels on the market today.

Typical solar panels require expensive installation and wiring costs to hook them up to the electrical circuit of a home. The Onyx “Plug -N-Play” will definitely appeal to the “Do-it-Yourself” crowd that wants to set up their own renewable energy array. You can, “literally point the panel at the sun and plug an extension cord directly into the panel for immediate power,” according to the product press release.

The demonstration site will be open to the press near the end of the week once the panels are up and running, and we’re interested to see how they perform. One downside of these panels is that since they aren’t hooked up to the electricity running to and from the house to the electrical grid, there’s no incentive to sell power back into the grid — as many people generating their own electricity do. Any power not being used in your home by these new Onyx panels will be lost — that is unless you opt up for the added battery.

Inhabitat (http://inhabitat.com/onyx-unveils-all-in-one-330-watt-plug-and-play-solar-panels/)

nondual
01-29-2012, 06:49 AM
The First Solar-Powered Electric Car Charging Stations in Sofia, Bulgaria (http://www.zeitnews.org/transportation/the-first-solar-powered-electric-car-charging-stations-in-sofia-bulgaria.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Transportation/solar-powered-station-sofia.jpg

A1 Co., Ltd. and BIES Ltd. opened the first Solar-Powered Electric Car Charging Stations in Sofia on 06.1.2012. The principle of operation of the station is simple - use of solar panels to collect solar energy. The connection between electric cars and batteries is performed by a special module. Electric cars in Bulgaria are still very few. According to experts, however, in 2012 a boom in the purchasing of such cars is expected. The Bulgarian government promises special preferences for the car owners.

A1 Co., Ltd. develops also electric power trains and modifies standard vehicles into electric ones. The company will participate in the 8th Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Exhibition to be held 28-30 March 2012 in Sofia, Bulgaria.

For the first time a model of a solar airplane ‘Solar Impulse’ will be presented by Solvay Bulgaria. This is the first aircraft in the world that can fly during day and night without fuel and emissions released.

The parallel Congress will provide the attendees with the latest updates, perspectives and good practices related to the EE & RES Financing, Biomass Resources and Bio energy. A new accent in the program will be the 1st PV Discussion Forum 'Photovoltaics'.

InHabitat (http://inhabitat.com/first-solar-powered-electric-car-charging-stations-open-in-sofia-bulgaria/)

nondual
01-31-2012, 07:52 AM
Ecotricity’s SeaRaser Tidal Power Generator Could be the World’s Cheapest Method Of Producing Electricity (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/ecotricitys-searaser-tidal-power-generator-could-be-the-worlds-cheapest-method-of-producing-electricity.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/searaser-e1327603036572.jpg

Over the years, scientists have come up with numerous ways to produce renewable energy, however cost has always been a huge barrier to the widespread adoption of clean tech – the economics are still in favor of fossil fuels. However UK-based alternative energy company Ecotricity believe all that is about to change – their new project, the SeaRaser, could solve two of the biggest challenges facing renewable energy by providing a steady source of energy at low-cost. Invented by Devon Energy engineer Alvin Smith, the SeaRaser harnesses the constant power of ocean swells to create electricity on demand.

As the ocean swells, it moves the SeaRaser’s two buoys up and down. They in turn pump seawater through a pipe to an onshore turbine. The system is simple, clean and cheap – and Ecotricity believes it could be the world’s least expensive way of producing electricity (even compared to fossil fuels).

Most sea-based energy-generating technologies are hampered by one very simple factor – electricity and water don’t mix, and seawater is corrosive. As a result, many of these generators have been very expensive to manufacture and maintain. The SeaRaser eliminates these problems by keeping most of the costly electrical components on-shore where they are protected from the marine environment and can be easily serviced.

The SeaRaser could also supply energy on-demand by pumping seawater into a coastal reservoir, where a hydropower turbine could produce extra energy for the grid. Ecotricity is currently looking for investments to drive the next phase of development, and they aim to have a product ready for market in 2014. Click the video below to see how it works.

FfmgxNpprWQ

Inhabitat (http://inhabitat.com/ecotricitys-searaser-tidal-power-generator-could-be-the-worlds-cheapest-method-of-producing-electricity/)

nondual
02-13-2012, 09:51 AM
World's largest offshore wind farm opens for business (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/worlds-largest-offshore-wind-farm-opens-for-business.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/walney.png

Walney wind farm off the coast of Cumbria in the UK yesterday became the world's largest offshore wind facility. One hundred and two turbines over 73 sq km (28 sq miles) provide a maximum output of 367.2 MW. It's claimed the facility will provide enough power for about 320,000 homes - half as many again as the total number in Cumbria.

The project's first phase, Walney 1, has been providing power since January 2011 from 51 137-meter-high (450-ft) turbines, each with a 107-m (350-ft) rotor diameter. The completed second phase, Walney 2, adds another 51 turbines of even greater size to the installation. These 150-m (492-ft) tall turbines have three 18-tonne (19.8-short ton) blades with a total diameter of 120 m (394 ft). Despite the differing dimensions, all turbines are Siemens-made 3.6 MW turbines. All told a single wind turbine weighs a hefty 550 tonnes (606 short tons). The Walney 2 installation was completed in an impressively tight six-month window.

The turbine specs appear well-suited to the UK's considerable wind assets, functioning at wind speeds between 4 and 25 m/s (9 and 56 mph), operating at a peak in winds of 14 m/s (31 mph), with mean wind speeds for the area thought to be just over 9 m/s (20 mph) at the critical altitude.

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/walney-2.png

The above map shows the Walney wind farm's position in the Irish Sea. The distance of the turbines to the coast varies between 14.4 and 25.8 km (9 and 16 miles) - a significant distance that helps to reduce the visual impact of the scheme. The blue and red lines indicate the export cables for Walney 1 and 2 respectively.

The facility makes use of offshore substations, stepping up the voltage from 34 kV to 132 kV. This is good news for the environment as transmission at higher voltage minimizes losses, and so reduces the need for inefficient lower-voltage transmission to an onshore substation.

The facility has been built by a company called Walney (UK) Offshore Windfarms Limited, a joint enterprise with DONG Energy and SSE as the major stakeholders. DONG is also the major stakeholder in the even larger London Array wind farm. It is not clear when this 1000 MW wind farm will be complete, though phase 1 should be making a maximum capacity of 630 MW available before the end of the year. Walney, therefore, will not hold the top spot for long. DONG will surely try to improve upon the construction of the Walney facility, phase 2 of which (according to the UK's Guardian newspaper) DONG claims was the fastest wind farm construction of its type.

Gizmag (http://www.gizmag.com/worlds-largest-wind-farm/21415/)

nondual
03-07-2012, 09:44 AM
New Energy-Dense Battery Could Enable Long-Distance Electric Cars (http://www.zeitnews.org/transportation/new-energy-dense-battery-could-enable-long-distance-electric-cars.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/new-energy-dense-battery-could-enable-long-distance-electric-cars_1.jpg

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md.—A company founded in the Palo Alto public library has taken a dose of government money and technology and turned it into the most energy-dense battery ever. Envia System's new lithium-ion battery packs roughly twice as much energy per gram as present batteries, the company will announce here at the third annual summit of the Advanced Research Projects Agency—Energy (ARPA–e).

"We achieved 400 watt-hours per kilogram," explains materials scientist Sujeet Kumar, Envia co-founder and chief technology officer. "We have made a 40 ampere cell in a large format that automakers can recognize and use," and one that has been validated by independent energy density tests at the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Crane, Ind.

With a $4 million grant from ARPA–e, the Envia technology builds on work done at Argonne National Laboratory that found that including manganese in a mix of materials for the cathode—the electrode to which the lithium ions flock—better energy densities could be achieved. The team then switched focus to the anode—the electrode from which lithium ions flow to produce the electric current—and boosted its performance by incorporating silicon along with the typical graphite.

By blending silicon with carbon, the researchers claim to have gotten around the problems of silicon anodes that have disabled other batteries ability to charge and discharge time and time again. Simply put, silicon swells. "It will hardly last 10 cycles because of the high volumetric changes," admits Kumar. But by encasing it in a carbon coating—as well as interlacing carbon fibers—the Envia team argues it has surmounted that problem and its battery has cycled 400 times—and counting. "Even if the silicon pulverizes in the first cycle, connectivity is maintained through the carbon fibers," Kumar adds, though that impacts the voltage.

Then there is so-called "thermal runaway," an engineering euphemism for batteries bursting into flame—a persistent problem with energy-dense storage devices based on lithium-ion technology. This is particularly true in cars where batteries must undergo a test in which an 8-millimeter nail penetrates the battery at speed. Envia claims its batteries pass that test. "It's mainly that the cells are much thinner," Kumar says. "It's very easy to remove the heat," though it will be up to each individual automaker whether they want to employ air or liquid cooling of battery packs.

The slim, energy-dense batteries developed at an Envia center in China could reduce the number needed per car by half. And the batteries are cheap at $125 per kilowatt-hour, less than half what current batteries cost, an expense that contributes some 65 percent of the cost of an electric car. But, in addition to further independent testing, the Envia battery must now embark on the multi-year process of testing by actual car-makers. GM is an investor, but Envia declines to identify who is interested. "We are working with all the brand name [carmakers] around the world," says Atul Kapadia, Envia chairman and CEO. The idea is to either form joint ventures to produce the batteries in tandem or to license the technology to pre-existing partners.

But, assuming a single nail doesn't bring down the new technology, the battery could boost the range of electric vehicles, such as GM's Chevy Volt. The more watt-hours per kilogram, the farther an electric car can travel. That means a Nissan LEAF boasting Envia's batteries might be able to travel the 300 miles between St. Louis and Chicago on a single $10 charge, rather than the roughly 80 it can travel today. "We expect Envia's next generation lithium-ion battery will revolutionize the [electric vehicle] industry by eliminating the three remaining barriers to mass adoption: cost, range and safety," Kumar said in a statement announcing the breakthrough. "The ability to drive up to 300 miles on a single charge will eliminate 'range anxiety.'"

Via Scientific American (http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=new-storage-projects-turns-co2-into-stone)

nondual
03-20-2012, 05:42 PM
New production process could cut solar cell prices by half (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/new-production-process-could-cut-solar-cell-prices-by-half.html)

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Boosting solar cell efficiency is seen as a key factor in making them more practical, but there is another way of looking at the matter ... if the price of those cells were lowered, we could generate more power simply by using more of them. That’s where Mississippi-based Twin Creeks Technologies comes into the picture. The company has developed a method of making crystalline silicon wafers which it says could reduce the cost of solar cell production by half.

Ordinarily, when crystalline silicon wafers are being made for use in solar cells, a chunk of silicon is cut into wafers that are each 200 micrometers thick. According to Twin Creeks, however, only the very surface of that wafer is “active” – the rest is wasted. Much less waste would occur if the wafers could be made thinner, but using traditional production techniques, such wafers would be too fragile to stand up to the rigors of photovoltaic panel production.

In Twin Creeks’ proprietary Hyperion process, three-millimeter-thick disks of crystalline silicon are placed in a vacuum chamber, where they’re bombarded with a beam of hydrogen ions. The ion accelerator that’s used is reportedly ten times more powerful than anything else commercially available.

Through control of the voltage of its beam, a layer of ions is precisely deposited on each disk. Those ions proceed to penetrate the silicon, so they’re located just below its surface. The disks are then robotically transferred to a furnace and heated. This causes the ions to expand into microscopic bubbles of hydrogen gas, which in turn causes a 20-micrometer-thick layer of silicon to peel off the surface of each disk. A supportive metal backing is then applied to that layer, and it’s ready for use.

The disks can be reused up to 14 times, each time “exfoliating” another layer of silicon.

The resulting ultra-thin wafers are claimed to be at least as efficient as their thicker traditional counterparts, yet require 90 percent less silicon to produce. The system can be added to existing production lines, although because less tools are required, production costs should also be significantly reduced. Additionally, the technology can be used with other single-crystal materials such as gallium nitride and germanium.

Presently, the technology can be seen in action at Twin Creeks’ commercial demonstration plant in Senatobia, Mississippi. The company intends to license the Hyperion system to existing solar cell manufacturers.

Gizmag (http://www.gizmag.com/hyperion-half-price-solar-wafers/21846/)

Bruce LeeRoy
03-25-2012, 09:35 PM
Seville, Spain

The solar tower above is about to be joined by several others using the latest solar energy technology which can store heat and supply electricity even after dark.
In the vicinity of Seville, exciting things are going on. Rising out of the Andalusian countryside like a gigantic obelisk, a 90 metre concrete tower surrounded by concentric rings of mirrors is Spain’s first major solar power station. The tower, known as PS10, is surrounded by 624 mirrors which produce some 60 MW, enough energy to power some 60,000 homes. The mirrors track the sun throughout the year, reflecting its light onto the solar receptor at the top of the tower. Water passes through and is heated up and turned into steam which powers a series of turbines to produce electricity. In addition there is also a nearby photovoltaic power plant consisting of 154 panels which will generate enough electricity for a further 1800 homes.

Two more solar ‘steam turbine’ plants are already being built as part of a project whose final aim is to provide enough solar energy for 180,000 homes, or most of the electricity needs of the 600,000 people of Seville. The completed project will be able to produce over 300MW. In addition to the power towers, there will also be PV arrays and parabolic solar collectors. All these solar power plants will be operational by 2013. All in all, the solar energy schemes near Seville will prevent emissions of more than 600,000t of CO2 into the atmosphere per year over their 25-year life. During manufacturing and construction the scheme will create more than 1,000 jobs, and subsequently there will be 300 service and maintenance jobs.

Apart from the solar energy supplies from the vicinity of the city, Seville City Council is also taking advantage of the region’s huge solar potential of installing PV panels on the roofs of municipal buildings all over the city – office buildings, schools, community centres and sports centres. By increasing the solar energy supply from within the city, the municipal electric bill, fossil fuel dependency and CO2 emissions are also being reduced, but an important additional aim is to increase awareness of Seville’s citizens about the tremendous benefits of solar energy and to encourage them to install solar arrays on their houses as well.

http://www.futurepolicy.org/3009.html

nondual
03-29-2012, 11:05 AM
3D solar towers offer up to 20 times more power output than traditional flat solar panels (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/3d-solar-towers-offer-up-to-20-times-more-power-output-than-traditional-flat-solar-panels.html)

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While we’ve looked at the development of solar cell technologies that employ nanoscale 3D structures to trap light and increase the amount of solar energy absorbed, MIT researchers have now used 3D on the macro scale to achieve power output that is up to 20 times greater than traditional fixed flat solar panels with the same base area. The approach developed by the researchers involves extending the solar cells upwards in a three-dimensional tower or cube configuration to enable them to better capture the sun's rays when it is lower on the horizon.

Solar panels placed flat on a rooftop are most effective at harnessing solar energy when the sun is close to directly overhead, but quickly lose their efficiency as the angle of the sun’s rays hitting the panel increases – during the mornings, evenings, in the cooler months and in locations far from the equator. It is exactly in these situations that the researcher’s vertical solar modules provided the biggest boosts in power output.

After exploring a variety of possible 3D configurations using a computer algorithm and testing them under a range of latitudes, seasons and weather with specially developed analytic software, the team built three different individual 3D modules and tested them on the MIT lab building roof for several weeks. The results showed a boost in power output ranging from double to more than 20 times that of fixed flat solar panels with the same base area.

By going vertical and collecting more sunlight when the sun is closer to the horizon, the team’s 3D modules were able to generate a more uniform output over time. This uniformity extended over the course of each day, the seasons of a year, and even when accounting for blockage from clouds and shadows.

The researchers say this increase in uniformity could overcome one of the biggest hurdles facing solar energy – predictability of electricity supply that currently makes it difficult to integrate solar power sources into the grid.

They add that this uniformity, as well as the much higher energy output for a given area, would help offset the increased cost of the 3D modules, which are higher per the amount of energy generated when compared to conventional flat solar panels.

While the team’s computer modeling showed complex shapes – such as a cube with each face dimpled inward – would offer a 10 to 15 percent improvement in power output when compared to a simpler cube, these would be difficult to manufacture. In their rooftop tests, the team studied both simpler cube modules as well as more complex accordion-like shapes that could be shipped flat for unfolding on site.

This accordion-like tower was the tallest structure the team tested and such a design could be installed in a parking lot to provide a charging station for electric vehicles, according to Jeffrey Grossman, the senior author of the study and the Carl Richard Soderberg Career Development Associate Professor of Power Engineering at MIT.

Grossman and his colleagues believe that with the fall in the cost of solar cells in recent years - to the point where they have become less expensive than their supporting structures and the outlay for the land upon which they are placed - makes it an ideal time to examine the benefits of different solar cell configurations.

“Even 10 years ago, this idea wouldn’t have been economically justified because the modules cost so much,” Grossman says. But now, he adds, “the cost for silicon cells is a fraction of the total cost, a trend that will continue downward in the near future.”

Buoyed by the success of the tests on the individual 3D modules, the team now plans to study a collection of solar towers that will enable them to examine the effects that one tower’s shadow will have on another as the sun moves across the sky over the course of a day.

While the team believes its 3D solar cells could offer big advantages in flat-rooftop installations or urban environments where space is limited, they say they could also be used in larger-scale applications, such as solar farms, once a configuration that minimizes the shading effects between towers has been developed.

The results of the MIT team’s computer modeling and rooftop testing of real modules appear in the journal Energy and Environmental Science (http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2012/ee/c2ee21170j).

Gizmag (http://www.gizmag.com/3d-vertical-solar-towers/21952/)

nondual
04-10-2012, 10:25 AM
Proposed Satellite Would Beam Solar Power to Earth (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/proposed-satellite-would-beam-solar-power-to-earth.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/sps-alpha-solar-power.jpg

PASADENA, Calif. — An energy-hungry Earth is in need of transformational and sustainable energy solutions, experts say.

For decades, researchers have been appraising the use of power-beaming solar-power satellites. But the projected cost, complexity and energy economics of the notion seemingly short-circuited the idea.

Now, a unique new approach has entered the scene, dubbed SPS-ALPHA, short for Solar Power Satellite via Arbitrarily Large PHased Array. Leader of the concept is John Mankins of Artemis Innovation Management Solutions of Santa Maria, Calif.

Mankins provided a detailed overview of the power-beaming concept here during the 2012 NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts meeting March 27-29. [Video: Beaming Power From Space (http://www.space.com/9819-beaming-solar-power-space.html)]

The NIAC is under the wing of NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist, which is providing a technology and innovation focus for the space agency.

Huge platforms

Last August, Artemis Innovation Management Solutions was selected for a NASA NIAC award to dive into the details of what Mankins labels "the first practical solar-power satellite concept."

The project will be an energetic one-year study of the design. Mankins is drawing upon a 25-year career at NASA and Caltech's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, doing work that ranged from flight projects and space mission operations to systems-level innovation and advanced technology research.

Along with reviewing the conceptual feasibility of the SPS-ALPHA, the team will carry out select proof-of-concept technology experiments.

SPS-ALPHA is a novel "biomimetic" approach to the challenge of space solar power, Mankins told SPACE.com.

Biomimetic refers to human-made processes, substances, devices or systems that imitate nature. The booming field of biomimetics is of interest to researchers in nanotechnology, robotics, artificial intelligence, the medical industry and the military.

Megawatts of power

If successful, Mankins said that this project would make possible the construction of huge platforms from tens of thousands of small elements that can deliver remotely and affordably tens to thousands of megawatts using wireless power transmission to markets on Earth, as well as missions in space, Mankins said.

SPS-ALPHA uses a large array of individually controlled thin-film mirrors, outfitted on the curved surface of the satellite. These movable mirrors intercept and redirect incoming sunlight toward photovoltaic cells affixed to the backside of the solar power satellite's large array.

The Earth-pointing side of this large modular circular array is tiled with a collection of microwave-power transmission panels that generate the coherent, low-intensity beam of radio frequency energy and transmits that energy to Earth.

Mass production

According to Mankins, the SPS-ALPHA has several important advantages over past solar-power satellite approaches.

For example, this new approach eliminates the need for a large integrated power management and distribution system. That significantly reduces the projected cost of the platform, Mankins said during the NIAC gathering.

Moreover, the SPS-ALPHA concept, Mankins said, enables a solar-power satellite that can be assembled entirely from individual system elements that weigh no more than 110 to 440 pounds (50 to 200 kilograms), allowing all pieces to be mass produced at dramatically lower cost than traditional space systems. Therefore, a drastically reduced cost of the SPS system is realizable, he said.

"The current project will provide a detailed analytical understanding of the SPS-ALPHA concept, with supporting experiments," Mankins said. "The needed next steps are to develop a working prototype of one or more of the modules and demonstrate the assembled system in the field. Over the next several years, the goal is to realize a low-Earth orbit flight test of the system," he concluded.

Space.com (http://www.space.com/15189-solar-power-beaming-satellite.html)

nondual
04-21-2012, 06:22 AM
IBM Speeds Push for 500-mile EV battery (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/ibm-speeds-push-for-500-mile-ev-battery.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/ibm_battery_500o_610x313.jpg

Ten years from now, range anxiety for electric cars could be a thing of the past.

IBM today announced two partners for a project aimed at building a lithium air battery able to propel an electric car 500 miles. Scientists from Asahi Kasei and Central Glass with expertise in membranes and electrolyte chemistries will join IBM researchers on the initiative.

Called the Battery 500 Project, the goal is to design an "air-breathing" battery that will use oxygen from the air to drive a new type of battery chemical reaction and, in the process, deliver a big jump in EV range potential. The company hopes to have a working demonstration by the end of next year.

The fact that IBM Research has expanded the research team with these two companies and other unnamed ones is a sign that the ambitious effort is on the right track, said Winfried Wilcke, principal investigator at IBM Research who started the project in 2009.

Materials scientists for years have been pursuing lithium air batteries, which use oxygen from the air to react with lithium ions to discharge and charge electric energy. It still remains in the realm of research but Wilcke said that IBM has made progress understanding the basic chemistry and made important decisions on how a working battery would be engineered.

"Unlike what we originally thought, we know we have a really good electrochemical reaction. The problems now are secondary," he said. "There are still tremendous engineering challenges ahead so there's no hope of it happening this decade."

The basic target of the research is to build a battery that would give an average-size family electric car a 500-mile range. The lithium ion batteries in the Nissan Leaf and Ford Focus Electric allow for between roughly 75 and 100 miles of range. The high-end edition of Tesla Motors' Model S will have an option for up to 300 miles of range.

A lithium air battery would use a different chemical reaction inside the battery during charge and discharge from today's lithium ion batteries. Using supercomputer simulations, IBM researchers found that new active components, namely the electrolytes, need to be different, Wilcke said.

The approach IBM is pursuing now would actually use two electrolytes, with one on the anode side and another on the cathode side. Because IBM has chosen a battery design with two electrolytes, membrane technology to control the movement of lithium ions is an important part of the research.

Cnet (http://news.cnet.com/8301-11386_3-57417588-76/ibm-speeds-push-for-500-mile-ev-battery/?tag=mncol)

nondual
05-20-2012, 09:16 AM
Bright future for solar power in space (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/bright-future-for-solar-power-in-space.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/space_main1.jpg

Researchers at the University of Strathclyde Glasgow, have tested equipment in space that would provide a platform for solar panels to collect the energy and allow it to be transferred back to earth through microwaves or lasers.

This unique development would provide a reliable source of power and could allow valuable energy to be sent to remote areas in the world, providing power to disaster areas or outlying areas that are difficult to reach by traditional means.

Dr Massimiliano Vasile, of the University of Strathclyde’s Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, who is leading the space based solar power research, said: “Space provides a fantastic source for collecting solar power and we have the advantage of being able to gather it regardless of the time of the day or indeed the weather conditions.

“In areas like the Sahara desert where quality solar power can be captured, it becomes very difficult to transport this energy to areas where it can be used. However, our research is focusing on how we can remove this obstacle and use space based solar power to target difficult to reach areas.

“By using either microwaves or lasers we would be able to beam the energy back down to earth, directly to specific areas. This would provide a reliable, quality source of energy and would remove the need for storing energy coming from renewable sources on ground as it would provide a constant delivery of solar energy.

“Initially, smaller satellites will be able to generate enough energy for a small village but we have the aim, and indeed the technology available, to one day put a large enough structure in space that could gather energy that would be capable of powering a large city.”

Last month, a team of science and engineering students at Strathclyde developed an innovative ‘space web’ experiment which was carried on a rocket from the Arctic Circle to the edge of space.

The experiment, known as Suaineadh – or ‘twisting’ in Scots Gaelic, was an important step forward in space construction design and demonstrated that larger structures could be built on top of a light-weight spinning web, paving the way for the next stage in the solar power project.

Dr Vasile added: “The success of Suaineadh allows us to move forward with the next stage of our project which involves looking at the reflectors needed to collect the solar power.

“The current project, called SAM (Self-inflating Adaptable Membrane) will test the deployment of an ultra light cellular structure that can change shape once deployed. The structure is made of cells that are self-inflating in vacuum and can change their volume independently through nanopumps.

“The structure replicates the natural cellular structure that exists in all living things. The independent control of the cells would allow us to morph the structure into a solar concentrator to collect the sunlight and project it on solar arrays. The same structure can be used to build large space systems by assembling thousands of small individual units.”

University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (http://www.strath.ac.uk/press/newsreleases/headline_618623_en.html)

nondual
05-29-2012, 10:45 AM
3,000' Tower Will Generate Clean Power from Hot Air and Cool Water (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/3000-tower-will-generate-clean-power-from-hot-air-and-cool-water.html)

http://www.zeitnews.org/images/stories/storypics/Energy/downdraft-energy-tower.jpg.492x0_q85_crop-smart.jpg

This is an idea that's been around since it was patented by Phillip Carlson in 1975, but it's never been carried out. Now San Luis, Arizona, right on the US-Mexico border, is preparing to bring it to life: a 3,000 foot tall tower built to generate clean electricity from hot dry air and cool water, reported EcoFriend.

The idea behind the downdraft energy tower is actually pretty simple, so long as the hollow structure is tall and in a hot, dry climate. At the top of the tower, air is sprayed with cool water, making it denser and heavier. The air travels downward through the tower, powering wind turbines that generate electricity. This (amusingly old school) video lays it out nicely:


Energy Towers Power & Water - Introductory Overview

2japP5d0qCI

A 5-minute 40-second overview of the Energy Towers technology. Developed at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology by Prof. Dan Zaslavsky, this is the most cost-effective technology for supplying zero-emission electricity from renewable sources. Electricity can be produced more cheaply than with virtually any other technology, including wind turbine, solar, coal, natural gas and nuclear. There also are 13 beneficial byproducts, including the ability to cheaply desalinate sea water in huge volumes.

Since Carlon's patent, most of the work on this technology has been done by researchers at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, including Dr Ramu Guetta and Prof Dan Zaslavsky, the brains behind the San Luis project.

Of course, there's the problem of dedicating large amounts of water in a desert city to the tower, and the energy required to send it 3,000 feet up. One third of the energy produced by the tower goes to that pumping; it could be worse. Clean Wind Energy, Inc. the company building the tower, estimates that the tower will produce up to 2,500 megawatt hours.

The construction isn't a done deal just yet. The land has been successfully leased and is now in the process of zoning approval. If it all comes together, Arizona, already a growing hub for solar power, could become a real leader in the clean energy game.

TreeHugger (http://www.treehugger.com/clean-technology/3000-tower-will-generate-clean-power-hot-air-and-cool-water.html)

nondual
05-29-2012, 05:36 PM
MAJOR ENERGY BREAKTHROUGH: ELECTRICITY GENERATED FROM WATER (http://truththeory.com/2012/05/29/major-energy-breakthrough-electricity-generated-from-water/)

— 29 May 2012

PR Newswire - Leading academic and industry experts have validated BlackLight’s new process that directly produces electric energy from the conversion of water vapor to a new, more stable form of Hydrogen.

Experts agree that BlackLight’s “Hydrino theory” represents a fundamental breakthrough in clean energy technology.

BlackLight Power, Inc. (BLP) today announced a major breakthrough in clean energy technology, which experts agree holds tremendous promise for a wide range of commercial applications. The announcement comes on the heels of BlackLight’s recent completion of a $5 million round of financing to support commercial development of its new process for producing affordable, reliable energy from water vapor.

In six separate, independent studies, leading scientists from academia and industry with PhDs from prestigious universities including the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the California Institute of Technology, confirm that BlackLight has achieved a technological breakthrough with its CIHT (Catalyst-Induced-Hydrino-Transition) clean energy generating process and cell. The Process is fueled by water vapor that is a gaseous component of air and present wherever there is any source of water. The CIHT cell harnesses this energy as electrical power output and is suitable for essentially all power applications including transportation applications and electrical power production completely autonomous of fuels and grid infrastructure at a small fraction of the current capital costs.

More here (http://truththeory.com/2012/05/29/major-energy-breakthrough-electricity-generated-from-water/).

nondual
06-03-2012, 09:32 AM
Sharp Hits Solar Cell Efficiency Record of 43.5% (http://www.zeitnews.org/energy/sharp-hits-solar-cell-efficiency-record-of-435.html)

With all of the different types of solar cells being developed from thin-film to crystalline silicon as well as new ways of boosting light absorption it seems there is always a new solar cell efficiency record being announced, but this new record from Sharp of 43.5% is a pretty big deal. A large jump over the company's previous record of 36.9% efficiency in November 2011, it shows that solar technology is getting ever closer to that 50% mark that could revolutionize the industry.

Sharp achieved the conversion efficiency record with their concentrator triple-junction compound solar cell that uses a lens-based system to focus sunlight on the cells to generate electricity.

According to Sharp:


Compound solar cells utilize photo-absorption layers made from compounds consisting of two or more elements, such as indium and gallium. The basic structure of this latest triple-junction compound solar cell uses Sharp’s proprietary technology that enables efficient stacking of the three photo-absorption layers, with InGaAs (indium gallium arsenide) as the bottom layer.

To achieve this latest increase in conversion efficiency, Sharp capitalized on the ability of this cell to efficiently convert sunlight collected via three photo-absorption layers into electricity. Sharp also optimized the spacing between electrodes on the surface of the concentrator cell and minimized the cell’s electrical resistance.

http://media.treehugger.com/assets/images/2012/05/sharp-solar.jpg.492x0_q85_crop-smart.jpg
© Sharp

Conventional solar panels that are on the market now still have an efficiency of only about 15 to 20 percent, but these breakthroughs made in labs will eventually lead to climbing efficiencies in mass market solar panels too. Sharp's compound solar cell technology is currently only used in space satellites, but the company wants to adapt the technology into small-surface-area solar cells that would be practical for use down here on the ground.

The conversion efficiency record was confirmed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy in April 2012 and it is the same exact conversion efficiency achieved by Solar Junction of the United States in March 2011. The fact that two companies have been able to achieve the same high efficiency is a good sign that the industry is quickly scaling up efficiency across the board.

Treehugger (http://www.treehugger.com/solar-technology/sharp-hits-solar-cell-efficiency-record-435.html)

Bruce LeeRoy
07-15-2012, 05:00 PM
I just "stumbleupon" this not sure if you posted it.

But do you see why the established Big Energy corporations don't like this idea, they would lose billions if not trillions of dollars, they should embrace it, and rent out the equipment to those unable to do for themselves at a reduced price of current cost's, and provide service. Once this infrastructure is set, its a pure money maker.

But people are very resistant to change, which is why I didn't wait for you people to politicize this issue, I like free shit.

http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/1JrPxs/inhabitat.com/germany-sets-new-solar-record-by-meeting-nearly-half-of-countrys-weekend-power-demand

Germany Sets New Solar Record By Meeting Nearly Half of Country’s Weekend Power Demand

http://assets.inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2012/05/germany-solar-record-sonnenschiff-537x357.jpg


Germany fed a whopping 22 gigawatts of solar power per hour into the national grid last weekend, setting a new record by meeting nearly half of the country’s weekend power demand. After the Fukushima disaster, Japan opted to shut down all of its nuclear power stations and Germany followed suit after considerable public pressure. This seems to have paved the way for greater investment in solar energy projects. The Renewable Energy Industry (IWR) in Muenster announced that Saturday’s solar energy generation met nearly 50 percent of the nation’s midday electricity needs AND was equal to 20 nuclear power stations at full capacity!

EldonG
07-15-2012, 09:45 PM
I just "stumbleupon" this not sure if you posted it.

But do you see why the established Big Energy corporations don't like this idea, they would lose billions if not trillions of dollars, they should embrace it, and rent out the equipment to those unable to do for themselves at a reduced price of current cost's, and provide service. Once this infrastructure is set, its a pure money maker.

But people are very resistant to change, which is why I didn't wait for you people to politicize this issue, I like free shit.

http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/1JrPxs/inhabitat.com/germany-sets-new-solar-record-by-meeting-nearly-half-of-countrys-weekend-power-demand

Germany Sets New Solar Record By Meeting Nearly Half of Country’s Weekend Power Demand

http://assets.inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2012/05/germany-solar-record-sonnenschiff-537x357.jpg
Stunning.

This country is run and populated by total idiots and is losing ground so fast we may never have the edge again.

Bruce LeeRoy
07-15-2012, 10:03 PM
Stunning.

This country is run and populated by total idiots and is losing ground so fast we may never have the edge again.

YOu got that right, and this is just from an energy perspective, not to mention the Climate effects this would have.

I am not putting alot of stock in the climate but it sure can't hurt.

Bruce LeeRoy
10-16-2012, 11:09 PM
Ideology trumps reason as Germans pay the price for abandoning nuclear power


Germany is facing rapidly climbing energy costs after turning away from nuclear power following the Fukushima disaster, instead relying increasingly on renewable energy. Meanwhile, its neighbors are building nuclear power stations on its doorstep.After a simultaneous earthquake and tsunami off the Japanese coast caused a nuclear meltdown at the Fukushima power plant in March last year, in the worst accident since Chernobyl, Chancellor Angela Merkel did not hesitate.With broad public support, she immediately ordered the closure of eight existing nuclear power plants, with the rest scheduled to be phased out by 2022, nearly fifteen years earlier than planned.Instead, she promised to bolster the role of renewable energy – in which Germany was already a European leader – pledging that 35 percent of all power consumed in the country would be from green sources by 2020, a figure later upped to 40 percent.The changes have been rapid. Nuclear power supplies 17 percent of the country’s energy needs, down from 23, while renewables have climbed from 20 to 25 percent in just months.Now comes the time to pay for Germany’s green vision.Despite technological advances, wind, solar, hydro and other green energy sources still remain an unprofitable investment in a fair market. The way to encourage their exploitation is through a set of feed-in tariffs, a policy where energy companies are forced to buy electricity from green generators at a price set by the government (which is usually legislated to remain the same for two decades).The German government has passed the cost of the payment from the energy companies to the consumer. Every German on the grid pays something called Umlage, a special surcharge for supporting green fuels that covers all the green energy subsidies, however much energy is produced.This week, energy companies announced that the charge would go up by 47 percent for next year. The average Germany household will now pay €250 a year to sponsor green energy producers, four times more than in 2009.
The overall value of the subsidy on green energy is likely to exceed €20 billion next year, about one percent of GDP.At the same time, the government has relieved large exporting companies (who consume a fifth of Germany’s electricity) from paying Umlage, for fear of crippling them, thus leaving ordinary Germans to bear the burden.That is on top of what are some of the highest electricity prices in Europe, which have already risen 44 percent since Merkel came to power seven years ago.This is hardly the ceiling.Faced with a scheme in which it seems almost impossible to lose money, German states, industrial giants and even enterprising individuals have all rushed to build wind turbines and solar panel farms.Never mind 35 or 40 percent, at the current rate by 2020 more than half of Germany’s energy will be obtained from renewables – and all subsidized by the taxpayer.“It's out of control,” summed up Kurt J. Lauk, Economic Council president from Angela Merkel’s own Christian Democrats party.Bursting vessels
The green expansion has also taxed the country’s power grid.As there are no controls on the program other than the promise to pay money for anyone who pumps power into the grid, the construction of facilities has been ad hoc, with no central planning.Inefficient energy sources such as solar, have been chosen alongside relatively reliable ones, like offshore wind, since the government paid for different energy resources based on the cost of using them, not their yield. There has been little consideration of the geographical location of the facilities, and whether there is capacity to transport the produced electricity. In contrast, relatively productive conventional energy power stations have been squeezed out by the subsidized green ones.A case in point: thinly-populated Lower Saxony in the north says it is expanding its wind power capacity to supply industrially-developed and densely-settled Bavaria in the south. But the Bavarian government is also striving for self-sufficiency, planning to use solar power, which is not as efficient. Yet, even if it does go on to buy “cheaper-made” electricity from Lower Saxony (which it has no financial incentive to do, as the taxpayer will pay the difference) there are not yet enough power lines to transport it down there. In the meantime, when northern wind farms start producing electricity, even if there is no market for it anywhere near, energy companies who cannot use it will still be obliged to pay producers.The country has started to suffer from occasional blackouts, as renewable energy sources are more unpredictable – depending on the daily cycle, sunrays, and wind, while maintaining total backup from conventionally-obtained electricity defeats the purpose of the innovations. There is also poor integration between renewable power sources, with their fluctuating supplies and the more traditional ones, many of which can only function efficiently if they are constantly producing energy.Experts estimate that a further €300 billion may need to be invested into the grid over the next decade alone.Power politics
Facing an attack from those within her own party, coalition partners, opponents and businesses Merkel, who faces an election in a year, has gone on the defensive.“We have achieved a lot but we are far from being where we should stand,” she said during an assembly of the German Employers Association on Tuesday.Merkel conceded that she is now hostage to renewable energy producers, who’ve been promised decades of guaranteed profits and have often invested billions themselves in power resources that could never survive in an open market."When a great number of people benefit from a law then it of course gets always more difficult to override that law by democratic means," she said.Merkel’s hand could still be forced if higher bills are accompanied by more severe power cuts during the winter (the hardest time for renewable energy producers) or damaging stories of inefficiency. One such recent example detailed how federal authorities are spending billions extending the power grid out into the sea (as it promises under its renewable energy legislation) towards sites of wind turbines that have not yet been built (according to the same laws its private owners are under no obligation to actually construct them).The environmental ministry is already devising a plan to hem in the uncontrolled sprawl of green power.Yet Merkel insists that the current problems require correction and not an overall re-think, and that once they are overcome “Germany will be a model for many countries around the world in how one can achieve a sustainable energy supply.”This may be so, but a recent survey showed that two thirds of Germans were not prepared to pay more than €50 each for the reform – a laughably small figure compared to what they have already paid, directly and through taxes, and nothing compared to the costs that lie ahead.
Across the border…
Germany’s foray into renewables has not converted most of its neighbors and a number of them are planning to construct nuclear power plants of their own, just as Germany is getting rid of hers.
Of the nine countries bordering it, only Denmark, Austria and Luxembourg do not produce nuclear power.
Indeed, most of the countries to the east are aggressively expanding their nuclear program.
Poland has just confirmed it will spend €12 billion on its first atomic power plant. The Czech Republic is taking bids to expand a Soviet-built facility, while Slovakia is completing a plant of its own. Russia is building a nuclear power station in its enclave of Kaliningrad, bordering Poland, and Belarus is also planning to start construction on its first facility on the western border.
On its western side, France and Belgium both receive more than half of their energy from nuclear power and have done for decades.
An accident on the scale of Chernobyl in any of those countries – the main fear of the anti-nuclear lobby – would be almost as likely to severely affect Germany as the origin country.
With the rapid phasing out of its nuclear plants, the German government has looked at the opinion polls (which show its citizens continue to be fiercely anti-nuclear) and not the spotless safety records of its power stations. Beyond the headlines, the impact of the drastic step will be to marginally lower what is already a historically minute risk, whatever the horrors of the few high-profile accidents.
This move, together with the equally swift embrace of renewable energy, shows the country embarking on an idealist environmental revolution, in which economic factors seem to have been the smallest of considerations.
Wading ever deeper into it in the midst of a Eurozone crisis, Germany seemingly cannot turn back, but will now doggedly carry on upon the course it set itself.

https://rt.com/news/germany-poland-nuclear-fukushima-574/

nondual
12-08-2012, 09:29 AM
HydroICE Solar-Powered Combustion Engine Could Cut Solar Costs By 75% (http://www.zeitnews.org/applied-sciences/energy/hydroice-solar-powered-combustion-engine-could-cut-solar-costs-75)

ARTICLE (http://www.zeitnews.org/articles) | DECEMBER 5, 2012

http://www.zeitnews.org/sites/default/files/resize/users/26/hydroice-solar-combustion-engine-537x358-431x288.jpg

While the idea of a solar powered car is attractive, the physical manifestation usually fails in both aesthetics and performance. Most of the solar-powered vehicles we’ve featured in the past are either extremely tiny, using the sun to charge up their electric batteries, or extremely awkward, with solar panels sprouting out from every available surface. But the folks at Missouri Sustainable Energy LLC aren’t interested in going down that road. Instead, they’re putting the sun to work through a technology we’re all too familiar with — the combustion engine. If successful, they could be on the road to a bright new future where the cost of solar energy drops by 75 percent.

Finding it hard to envision the mechanics that would allow the sun to power a conventional combustion engine? Don’t worry — it takes a little imagination. Inventors Matt Bellue and Ben Cooper (the creative minds behind the HydroICE project) say that instead of using gasoline to ignite a spark and thus moving a piston to create power, their engine would use the heating power of the sun.

“Take that same [combustion] engine and modify the variables slightly; instead of injecting gas/diesel, inject hot oil (using mirrored parabolic solar collectors, temperatures of 800 degrees farenheit can be reached!) into the cylinder,” explain the duo on the HydroICE project’s Indiegogo page. “Instead of a spark, add a few microdroplets of water. When the water contacts the hot oil, the oil’s thermal energy is transferred to the water and it instantly flashes to steam.” While you’re probably wondering how this could be integrated into a vehicle, a more immediate application could be as an off-grid source of electricity that could replace gas-powered generators.

It seems like science fiction but this unique, cleaner-burning engine is already on its way to becoming a reality. Bellue and Cooper have converted a 31cc 2-stroke gas engine to run as a HydroICE engine. They’ve also partnered with Missouri State University and the Missouri University of Science and Technology to develop all the necessary peripheral hardware (such as the solar collectors), and to test the engine’s efficiency.

+ HydroICE Project (http://hydroicesolar.com/)

nondual
12-19-2012, 09:44 AM
Wind and Solar Power Paired With Storage Could Power Grid 99.9 Percent of the Time (http://www.zeitnews.org/applied-sciences/energy/wind-and-solar-power-paired-storage-could-power-grid-999-percent-time)

ARTICLE (http://www.zeitnews.org/articles) | DECEMBER 10, 2012

http://www.zeitnews.org/sites/default/files/imagecache/body_image/users/13/article_top_body_images/wind-and-solar-power-paired-storage-could-power-grid-999-percent-time-1355180857.jpg

Renewable energy could fully power a large electric grid 99.9 percent of the time by 2030 at costs comparable to today’s electricity expenses, according to new research by the University of Delaware and Delaware Technical Community College.

A well-designed combination of wind power, solar power and storage in batteries and fuel cells would nearly always exceed electricity demands while keeping costs low, the scientists found. “These results break the conventional wisdom that renewable energy is too unreliable and expensive,” said co-author Willett Kempton, professor in the School of Marine Science and Policy in UD’s College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment. “The key is to get the right combination of electricity sources and storage — which we did by an exhaustive search — and to calculate costs correctly.”

The authors developed a computer model to consider 28 billion combinations of renewable energy sources and storage mechanisms, each tested over four years of historical hourly weather data and electricity demands. The model incorporated data from within a large regional grid called PJM Interconnection, which includes 13 states from New Jersey to Illinois and represents one-fifth of the United States’ total electric grid.

Unlike other studies, the model focused on minimizing costs instead of the traditional approach of matching generation to electricity use. The researchers found that generating more electricity than needed during average hours — in order to meet needs on high-demand but low-wind power hours — would be cheaper than storing excess power for later high demand.
Storage is relatively costly because the storage medium, batteries or hydrogen tanks, must be larger for each additional hour stored.

One of several new findings is that a very large electric system can be run almost entirely on renewable energy.

“For example, using hydrogen for storage, we can run an electric system that today would meeting a need of 72 GW, 99.9 percent of the time, using 17 GW of solar, 68 GW of offshore wind, and 115 GW of inland wind,” said co-author Cory Budischak, instructor in the Energy Management Department at Delaware Technical Community College and former UD student.
A GW (“gigawatt”) is a measure of electricity generation capability. One GW is the capacity of 200 large wind turbines or of 250,000 rooftop solar systems. Renewable electricity generators must have higher GW capacity than traditional generators, since wind and solar do not generate at maximum all the time.

The study sheds light on what an electric system might look like with heavy reliance on renewable energy sources. Wind speeds and sun exposure vary with weather and seasons, requiring ways to improve reliability. In this study, reliability was achieved by: expanding the geographic area of renewable generation, using diverse sources, employing storage systems, and for the last few percent of the time, burning fossil fuels as a backup.

During the hours when there was not enough renewable electricity to meet power needs, the model drew from storage and, on the rare hours with neither renewable electricity or stored power, then fossil fuel. When there was more renewable energy generated than needed, the model would first fill storage, use the remaining to replace natural gas for heating homes and businesses and only after those, let the excess go to waste.

The study used estimates of technology costs in 2030 without government subsidies, comparing them to costs of fossil fuel generation in wide use today. The cost of fossil fuels includes both the fuel cost itself and the documented external costs such as human health effects caused by power plant air pollution. The projected capital costs for wind and solar in 2030 are about half of today’s wind and solar costs, whereas maintenance costs are projected to be approximately the same.

“Aiming for 90 percent or more renewable energy in 2030, in order to achieve climate change targets of 80 to 90 percent reduction of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide from the power sector, leads to economic savings,” the authors observe.
The research was published online last month in the Journal of Power Sources.

Sources University of Delaware (http://www.udel.edu/udaily/2013/dec/renewable-energy-121012.html)